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I am trying to remember if, using a standard c compiler (C89), the two if statements below will evaluate in the same way.

snippet 1:

boolean function(formattype* format)
{
    if(format != null && (*format == format1 || *format == format2 || *format == format3) )
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}

would evaluate in the same way as snippet 2:

boolean function(formattype* format)
{

    if(format != null && (*format == format1 || format2 || format3) )
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}

I am only interested in the evaluation of the second comparison and I only added the function for illustration purposes. I seem to remember using some similar method to evaluate the == using each of the ||'d arguments without typing them all out but cannot remember the specifics.

Edit: Perhaps the function made things more confusing than it did help illustrate.

I am trying to evaluate the following

if(format != null && (*format == format1 || *format == format2 || *format == format3) )

The first is just a check to prevent de-referencing a null pointer, so ignore it. The second three are seeing if the de-referenced format pointer is equal to any of the three different format types (they are in an enum if you must know).

I do not want to use a macro, I want to simplify the comparison. It may not be possible, I simply have a vague memory of performing a similar operation.

I thought it was something along the lines of the second example.

if(format != null && (*format == format1 || format2 || format3) )
share|improve this question
    
Yes, I can do this using macros. Give me a few minutes, and I'll give you your answer. – Richard J. Ross III Aug 21 '12 at 21:39
    
Also, does it need to be ansi? Lets face it, most compilers support either C99 or C++ these days, why ansi? – Richard J. Ross III Aug 21 '12 at 21:40
    
removed: I am having trouble with the comment system :-/ – bobthearsonist Aug 21 '12 at 21:42
    
What is formattype? Another pointer? a struct? an integer? all that makes my life easier. – Richard J. Ross III Aug 21 '12 at 21:42
    
It has to be ANSI. I work in defense and that is what we use. – bobthearsonist Aug 21 '12 at 21:50
up vote 1 down vote accepted

No it won't. While the first check is valid, the second will give you an erronous result. It basically means: "If (*format equals format1) OR (format2 is nonzero) OR (format3 is nonzero)" - assuming that either of format2 or format3 is nonzero, this will always evaluate to true.

You probably meant to tamper with bitwise operators. If format 1, 2 and 3 are different powers of two, then you can check whether *format is one of them using

if (*format & (format1 | format2 | format3))

not the bitwise (as opoosed to logical) AND and OR operators. However, this approach is not safe - it'll evaluate to true even if the memory pointed to by format is the sum of some of the format 1, 2 and 3 constants (assuming formattype is an integral type).

share|improve this answer
    
"If (*format equals format1) OR (format2 is nonzero) OR (format3 is nonzero)" this is what I thought. I was looking for some way to use precedence and the operators to make it do what I wanted, I don't think it is possible. The first example is perfectly valid and is what I am currently using. Thanks for the help! – bobthearsonist Aug 21 '12 at 23:09

No, they are completely different. The second example is equivalent to:

if(format != null && ( (*format == format1) || (format2) || (format3) ) )
share|improve this answer
    
Could you help me figure out the syntax I am trying to recall then? – bobthearsonist Aug 21 '12 at 21:39
    
AFAIK, you aren't remembering any syntax. The second example is generally wrong if you are trying to test for equality between *format to format2. – Josh Petitt Aug 22 '12 at 0:24

If you had access to C++11 or GCC extensions, here are two implementations using macros that do what you want:

// GCC extension version
#define OR_ALL(CMP, VALUES...) \
({ \
    __typeof__(CMP) values_arr[] = { VALUES }; \
    size_t values_cnt = sizeof(values_arr) / sizeof(*values_arr); \
    int found = 0;\
    for (int i = 0; i < values_cnt; i++) { \
        if (CMP == values_arr[i]){ \
            found = 1;\
            break;\
        }\
    }\
    found;\
})

// C++ 11 version
#define OR_ALL_CPP(CMP, VALUES...) or_all_cpp_impl<decltype(CMP), VALUES>(CMP)

template <typename T, T... args>
bool or_all_cpp_impl(T cmp)
{
    T arguments[] = { args... };
    size_t count = sizeof(arguments) / sizeof(T);

    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
        if (cmp == arguments[i])
            return true;
    }

    return false;
}

I would prefer the C++ version, if it was available, but they both function similarly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for trying, this is much more complicated than what I was looking for. I do not think the compiler will do what I was asking for in the first place. – bobthearsonist Aug 21 '12 at 23:12

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