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This may be answered already but I am going to ask it anyways. I have two versions of a script (comp.sh)-

#!/bin/sh
export tDay=$(date '+%Y%m%d')
newfile="filename_$tDay"
filename="filename_20120821100002.csv"
echo $newfile $filename
if [ $filename = *$newfile* ]
then
  echo "Matched"
else
  echo "Not Matched!"
fi

Output:
$ ./comp.sh
filename_20120821 filename_20120821100002.csv
Not Matched!

And

#!/bin/sh
export tDay=$(date '+%Y%m%d')
newfile="filename_$tDay"
filename="filename_20120821100002.csv"
echo $newfile $filename
if [[ $filename = *$newfile* ]]
then
  echo "Matched"
else
  echo "Not Matched!"
fi

$ comp.sh
filename_20120821 filename_20120821100002.csv
Matched

Could someone explain me Why the difference?

Also - under what circumstances should [ ] be used vs. [[ ]] and vice versa?

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4  
This question is similar and has a good answer that points to great documentation: stackoverflow.com/questions/669452/… –  malvim Aug 21 '12 at 22:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

test's string equality operator doesn't do globs.

$ [ abc = *bc ] ; echo $?
1
$ [[ abc = *bc ]] ; echo $?
0
share|improve this answer
    
I can see that. But why, can you elaborate why [ ] vs. [[ ]] makes the difference? –  Annjawn Aug 21 '12 at 22:03
1  
No, I can't. There are a great many things most people don't know, simply because the decision-making process that brought those things about was opaque. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 21 '12 at 22:05
    
Ok, so [ ] apparently was(is) a program test? –  Annjawn Aug 21 '12 at 22:08
    
@Annjawn: It is available as both a separate program and as a bash builtin. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 21 '12 at 22:09
1  
@pst: From help [[: "When the ==' and !=' operators are used, the string to the right of the operator is used as a pattern and pattern matching is performed." where "pattern" means "glob". –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 21 '12 at 22:10

[[ is a bash built-in, and cannot be used in a #!/bin/sh script. You'll want to read the Conditional Commands section of the bash manual to learn the capabilities of [[. The major benefits that spring to mind:

  • == and != perform pattern matching, so the right-hand side can be a glob pattern
  • =~ and !~ perform regular expression matching. Captured groups are stored in the BASH_REMATCH array.
  • boolean operators && and ||
  • no word splitting, so it's not strictly necessary to quote your variables.

The major drawback: your script is now bash-specific.

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Also - under what circumstances should [ ] be used vs. [[ ]] and vice versa?

It depends. If you care about portability and want your shell scripts to run on a variety of shells, then you should never use [[. If you want the features provided by [[ on some shells, you should use [[ when you want those features. Personally, I never use [[ because portability is important to me.

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But lets say I don't want to use [[ ]] but also want to do substring comparison as in my code above, how'd I do that? –  Annjawn Aug 21 '12 at 22:45
    
Are you looking for if echo "$filename" | grep -qF "$newfile"; then ... ? –  William Pursell Aug 21 '12 at 23:07
    
something like that but without grep. So if i understand this, this is the only way to make my code compatible on multiple shell types and avoid using [[. –  Annjawn Aug 22 '12 at 0:23
    
its not the only way, you can also do case "$filename" in *$newfile* ) ... –  William Pursell Aug 22 '12 at 0:32
    
so do you suggest using these alternatives other than using [[ $var = *var2* ]] syntax? –  Annjawn Aug 22 '12 at 0:40

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