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Using pythons itertools, I'd like to create an iterator over the outer product of all permutations of a bunch of lists. An explicit example:

import itertools
A = [1,2,3]
B = [4,5]
C = [6,7]

for x in itertools.product(itertools.permutations(A),itertools.permutations(B),itertools.permutations(C)):
    print x

While this works, I'd like to generalize it to an arbitrary list of lists. I tried:

for x in itertools.product(map(itertools.permutations,[A,B,C])):
    print x

but it did not do what I intended. The expected output is:

((1, 2, 3), (4, 5), (6, 7))
((1, 2, 3), (4, 5), (7, 6))
((1, 2, 3), (5, 4), (6, 7))
((1, 2, 3), (5, 4), (7, 6))
((1, 3, 2), (4, 5), (6, 7))
((1, 3, 2), (4, 5), (7, 6))
((1, 3, 2), (5, 4), (6, 7))
((1, 3, 2), (5, 4), (7, 6))
((2, 1, 3), (4, 5), (6, 7))
((2, 1, 3), (4, 5), (7, 6))
((2, 1, 3), (5, 4), (6, 7))
((2, 1, 3), (5, 4), (7, 6))
((2, 3, 1), (4, 5), (6, 7))
((2, 3, 1), (4, 5), (7, 6))
((2, 3, 1), (5, 4), (6, 7))
((2, 3, 1), (5, 4), (7, 6))
((3, 1, 2), (4, 5), (6, 7))
((3, 1, 2), (4, 5), (7, 6))
((3, 1, 2), (5, 4), (6, 7))
((3, 1, 2), (5, 4), (7, 6))
((3, 2, 1), (4, 5), (6, 7))
((3, 2, 1), (4, 5), (7, 6))
((3, 2, 1), (5, 4), (6, 7))
((3, 2, 1), (5, 4), (7, 6))
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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You missed the * to unpack the list into 3 arguments

itertools.product(*map(itertools.permutations,[A,B,C]))
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This solves the stated problem - but it has the unfortunate side effect of expanding the permutations into the full lists, completely undermining the intention of an iterator. When one of the lists is is even a medium size say 13, N! becomes a huge number when stored in memory. –  Hooked Aug 22 '12 at 15:41
    
@Hooked No! It will expand the list with 3 iterators in 3 arguments (that are still iterators) –  JBernardo Aug 22 '12 at 15:45
    
Let A=range(13) and the same for B and C. Granted there are 13!**3 elements in this iterator, but we should be able to walk through them (that's the whole point of iterators right?). The memory usage blows up before it lists a single one. Try it - do you not have the same effect? –  Hooked Aug 22 '12 at 15:49
    
@Hooked it will happen in your original version as well. That's some product related problem... I'll try to check later (but both code run the same way) –  JBernardo Aug 23 '12 at 2:48
    
@Hooked now I remember! That's quite simple: product needs to transform your iterators into lists before because they need to be looped many times (and an iterator can only be used once) –  JBernardo Aug 23 '12 at 2:51

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