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$(document).ready(function(){
  var timezone = "GMT";
  var num1 = Math.random();
  $.getJSON("http://178.79.191.15/json.php?num="+num1,
    function(data){
        console.log(data.hour);
      if (data.hour == 0 || data.hour == 1 || data.hour == 2 || data.hour == 3) {
        $('#pokerform').show();     
      } else {
        $('#wrongtime').show(); 
      }
    })
});

The above is my function, it's working on Chrome/FF but not in IE.

I've set up header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *'); on http://178.79.191.15/json.php

What could be the issue?

share|improve this question
    
Can you elaborate a bit more about how it isn't working? What error do you get? – Blender Aug 22 '12 at 0:43
    
@Blender No errors, when I look in the IE developer tools I can see that for some reason it's not fetching the JSON url at all.. I can see it downloading jquery from google, but nothing afterwards – Or Weinberger Aug 22 '12 at 0:45
    
it might be your cache – Click Upvote Aug 22 '12 at 0:48
    
@Click Upvote that's why I'm using the num1 thing – Or Weinberger Aug 22 '12 at 0:48
    
@hoverhand I don't think that jQuery supports cross-domain Ajax requests in IE. – Šime Vidas Aug 22 '12 at 0:54

You have a few issues:

For JavaScript you should use === instead of ==, especially when checking against the value of 0. You are also missing a semi-colon to close out your $.getJSON();.

Here is the revised code:

$(document).ready(function() {
    var timezone = "GMT",
        num1 = Math.random()
    ;
    $.getJSON("http://178.79.191.15/json.php?num=" + num1, function(data) {
        console.log(data.hour);
        if (data.hour === 0 || data.hour === 1 || data.hour === 2 || data.hour === 3) {
            $('#pokerform').show();
        } else {
            $('#wrongtime').show();
        }
    });
});​
share|improve this answer
    
You do know that JSON data is all strings by default? So he will have to do parseInt() on it all before he could compare it to integers using === – Click Upvote Aug 22 '12 at 8:43
    
Although I understand why you think that, you're actually technically wrong, as JSON can differentiate between value types. Read up on value at: json.org. – Valjas Aug 22 '12 at 15:20
    
strange, whenever i pass something from my php to JSON, it seems to convert everything to strings. May be its just php's json_encode function – Click Upvote Aug 22 '12 at 16:14
    
Or may be its just for data fetched from the database, php treats them as strings even when they're ints and thus they're converted to strings in my code – Click Upvote Aug 22 '12 at 16:16
    
Yes, that is why I understand why you had that impression, because most languages and storage devices treat JSON as string by default. – Valjas Aug 22 '12 at 20:13

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