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I'm struggling to learn object oriented javascript. I have an object constructor that looks like this:

//generic object
function myObject(value1, value2, value3){
this.value1 = value1;
this.value2 = value2;
this.value3 = value3;
this.method1 =method1;
}

function method1(){
alert('hello');
}

function method2(){
alert('hello again');
}

I'm creating new instances of this object like this:

instance1 = new myObject(
1, //value1
2, //value2
3  //value3
)

My problem is this: On a few instances of myObject I need custom values and methods. I would like to add them at the point of creation. But I can't figure out how to do it without writing the instance name again, which I'm trying to avoid since it would significantly slow down the process of adding new objects.

Is there some way to replace this code..

 instance1 = new myObject(
 1, //value1
 2, //value2
 3  //value3
 )
 instance1.method2 =method2;
 instance1.value4 =4;

..with something that doesn't require repeating the name "instance1"?

share|improve this question
    
"it would significantly slow down the process of adding new objects" - It might increase the amount of typing you have to do, but I don't see why it would slow down actual execution. Is your concern typing or execution speed? (Also: indent your code!) –  nnnnnn Aug 22 '12 at 1:37
    
@nnnnnn I mean the typing speed. This project involves creating hundreds of objects and I'm very skilled in making typos :) –  Sony packman Aug 22 '12 at 1:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you have jQuery available, you can use jQuery.extend() and avoid having to retype instance1. jQuery.extend() copies properties from one object to another.

jQuery.extend(instance1, {
    method2: method2
    value4: 4
});

This will copy all the properties of the second argument to the object in the first argument. See the jQuery doc for more info.


If you wanted to specify this as part of the constructor, you could do so like this and not have any additional lines of code to type:

function myObject(value1, value2, value3, extraProperties){
    this.value1 = value1;
    this.value2 = value2;
    this.value3 = value3;
    this.method1 = method1;
    if (extraProperties) {
        jQuery.extend(this, extraProperties);
    }
}

In that case, you would just code this:

var instance1 = new myObject(1, 2, 3, {method2: method2, value4: 4});

Of course, the more Object Oriented way to do this would be to create prototypes for each type of object you want (some could inherit from others) and then just instantiate the right type of object rather than add instance-specific methods and properties.

Or, create a single prototype that has all the methods/capabilities you might need on it for all the uses of the object rather than adding instance specific methods. In javascript, there is no penalty for having methods on an object that you don't use sometimes if they are on the prototype. Things on the prototype are free per instance (no storage consumption per instance, no initialization cost per instance, etc...).

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? This directly answers the question the OP asked which was how to avoid retyping instance1 over and over again when adding new properties? –  jfriend00 Aug 22 '12 at 1:09
    
+1 looks good to me –  antony.trupe Aug 22 '12 at 1:15
    
I'm selecting this as the answer since it felt easiest for me to grasp. Probably the most valuable advice for me was that you pointed out a more object oriented approach (instantiating the right type of object instead of adding instance specific properties) and I think that is the way I'm going to go. –  Sony packman Aug 22 '12 at 1:41

You could create an update function on the MyObject prototype

function MyObject(value1, value2, value3){
    this.value1 = value1;
    this.value2 = value2;
    this.value3 = value3;
    this.method1 =method1;
}

MyObject.prototype.update = function( args ) {
    for(var name in args) {
        this[ name ] = args[ name ];
    }
};

//using it
var instance1 = new MyObject( 1, 2, 3 );
instance1.update( {
    method2: method2,
    value4: 4
});

Something to note, I changed the name of your constructor function from myObject to MyObject. In JavaScript, it is a convention that constructor functions are names with pascal case not camel case. This way when developers see a function that is pascal case they know they need to use the new keyword. You can read more here: http://elegantcode.com/2010/12/21/basic-javascript-part-4-enforcing-new-on-constructor-functions/

I would also reccomend as a new JS dev to check out this free Learn jQuery and JavaScript series from AppendTo.com http://learn.appendto.com/

share|improve this answer
    
Why reinvent the update() function when they already have jQuery.extend() which does that already and actually has more capabilities (deep copy, multiple objects, etc...)? –  jfriend00 Aug 22 '12 at 1:11
    
@jfriend00 Because of this line "I'm struggling to learn object oriented javascript". $.extend is a bit of magic to someone new to JS. I wanted to show what extending an object would look like with raw JavaScript. –  Paul Aug 22 '12 at 1:14
    
I like teaching the newbie how things really work, but if a library is available, I'd much rather use a tried and true and more capable library function than rewrite my own. Less code too. –  jfriend00 Aug 22 '12 at 1:22
    
As the newbie in question I appreciate the aspect of schooling me. However I'm having a hard time understanding what the for loop does in this particular answer.. That makes the jQuery answers seem more attractive to me. –  Sony packman Aug 22 '12 at 1:28
function myObject (value1, value2, value3, attributes)
{
    $.extend(this, attributes);
    // the rest of your code
}

// Usage
var obj = new myObject(1,1,1,{ abc: 123, something: "nothing" });

Note: this would not be global. Aka if you make 2 objects with different attributes values then they'll each have their own custom attributes. If you want to make these attributes effect every object take a look at adjusting the prototype of it.

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