Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am a PHP programmer learning Python, when ever I get a chance.

I read that Python web Application stay active between requests. Meaning that data stays in memory and is available between requests, right?

I am wondering how that works.

In php we place a cookie with a unique token, and save data in sessions. Sessions are arrays, saved on disk or database. Between requests the session functions, restore the correct session array based on the cookie with the unique token. That means each browser gets it's own unique session, and the session has a preset expiration time. If the user is inactive and the expiration get's triggered then the session gets purged. A new session has to be created when the user comes back.

My understanding is Python doesn't need this, because the application stays active between requests.

Doesn't each request get a unique thread in Python?

How does it distinguish between requests, who the requester is?

Is there a handling method to separate vars between users and application?

Lets say I have a dict saved, is this dict globally available between all requests from any browser, or only to that one browser.

When and how does the memory get cleared. If everything stays in the memory. What if the app is running for a couple years without a restart. There must be some kind of expiration setting or memory handling?

One commenter says it depends on the web app. So I am using Bottle.py to learn.

share|improve this question
    
There's a lot of things that are dependent on the web framework you're using. CherryPy does things differently than Django which does things differently than Plone. I would imagine, though, that much of what stays true for most web applications would hold in the case of Python, though. – Makoto Aug 22 '12 at 1:03
    
I am using bottle.py – RoboTamer Aug 22 '12 at 1:06

I would assume the answer would depend on which web application framework you are using within python. Some of them have session management pieces in them that track a user across requests. But if you just had a basic port listener that responded with http, you would have to build any cookie support or session management yourself.

The other big difference is that in php, you have a module installed on the server that the actual http server delegates to in order to generate a response. PHP doesn't handle the routing or actual serving of the responses. Where as python can actually be the server and the resource for generating the response. It depends on how python is installed/accessed on the machine where the server is running. So in that sense you can do whatever you want within a python web application.

If you are interested, you should look at some available python web frameworks.

Edit: I see you mentioned bottle.py, and out of the box, it does not provide authentication and session management because it's a micro framework for fast prototyping and not necessarily suitable for a large scale application (although not impossible, just a lot of work).

share|improve this answer
    
I think my question is more general. For example, lets say I have a http GET var and I save that in a python dict. Is that dict now available across all requests from any browser, I am guessing not. If not is there a way to make it available/global? – RoboTamer Aug 22 '12 at 1:22
    
As far as I know, bottle.py does not have that feature. But nothing would stop you from writing it to a flat file on the filesystem and reading it back out or storing it in a database. As I stated earlier, there are many other python web frameworks out there that do provide session management and things like that. But you unfortunately picked one that doesn't at the moment. Sorry! – Matt Phillips Aug 22 '12 at 1:29

Yes and no. If you check out this question you get an idea how it could work for a Django application.

However, the way you state it, it will not work. Defining a dict in one request without passing it somewhere in order to make it accessible in following request will obviously not make it available in further requests. So, yes, you have the options do this but its not the casue out of the box!

share|improve this answer

I was able to persist an object in Python between requests before using Twisted's web server. I have not tried seeing for myself if it persists across browsers though but I have a feeling it does. Here's a code snippet from the documentation:

Twisted includes an event-driven web server. Here's a sample web application; notice how the resource object persists in memory, rather than being recreated on each request:

from twisted.web import server, resource
from twisted.internet import reactor

class HelloResource(resource.Resource):
    isLeaf = True
    numberRequests = 0

    def render_GET(self, request):
        self.numberRequests += 1
        request.setHeader("content-type", "text/plain")
        return "I am request #" + str(self.numberRequests) + "\n"

reactor.listenTCP(8080, server.Site(HelloResource()))
reactor.run()
share|improve this answer

First of all you should understand the difference between local and global variables in python, and also how thread local storage works.

This is a (very) short explanation:

  • global variables are those declared at module scope and are shared by all threads. They live as long as the process is running, unless explicitly removed
  • local variables are those declared inside a function and instantiated for each call of that function. They are deleted when the function is over unless it is still referenced somewhere else.
  • thread local stoarage enables defining global variables that are specific to the current thread. The live as tong as the current thread is running, unless explicitly removed.

And now I'll try to answer your original questions (the answers are specific to bottle.py, but it is the most common implementation in python web servers)

Doesn't each request get a unique thread in Python?

Each concurrent will have a separate thread, future requests might reuse the previous threads.

How does it distinguish between requests, who the requester is?

bottle.py uses thread local storage to access the current request

Is there a handling method to separate vars between users and application?

Sounds like you are looking for a session. If so, there is no standard way of doing it, because different implementation have advantages and disadvantages. For example this is a bottle.py middleware for sessions.

Lets say I have a dict saved, is this dict globally available between all requests from any browser, or only to that one browser. When and how does the memory get cleared.

If everything stays in the memory. What if the app is running for a couple years without a restart. There must be some kind of expiration setting or memory handling?

Exactly, there must be an expiration setting. Since you are using a custom dict you need a timer that checks each entry in the dict for expiration.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.