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I have a matrix that should have ones on the diagonal but the columns are mixed up.

Messed up matrix

But I don't know how, without the obvious for loop, to efficiently interchange rows to get unity on the diagonals. I'm not even sure what key I would pass to sort on.

Any suggestions?

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2  
since they're floats, can you guarantee the ones are exactly 1.0 and unique in their columns? –  wim Aug 22 '12 at 3:00
    
@wim: There is the issue of floating point error. But, each entry along the diagonal is guaranteed to have the highest value in that row. –  mac389 Aug 22 '12 at 3:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use numpy's argmax to determine the goal column ordering and reorder your matrix using the argmax results as column indices:

>>> z = numpy.array([[ 0.1 ,  0.1 ,  1.  ],
...                  [ 1.  ,  0.1 ,  0.09],
...                  [ 0.1 ,  1.  ,  0.2 ]])

numpy.argmax(z, axis=1)

>>> array([2, 0, 1]) #Goal column indices

z[:,numpy.argmax(z, axis=1)]

>>> array([[ 1.  ,  0.1 ,  0.1 ],
...        [ 0.09,  1.  ,  0.1 ],
...        [ 0.2 ,  0.1 ,  1.  ]])
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Very nice. For a 1000x1000 array, yours runs in 0.1s and mine runs in 10s. –  Snowball Aug 22 '12 at 3:30
>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.array([[ 1. ,  0.5,  0.5,  0. ],
...               [ 0.5,  0.5,  1. ,  0. ],
...               [ 0. ,  1. ,  0. ,  0.5],
...               [ 0. ,  0.5,  0.5,  1. ]])
>>> np.array(sorted(a, cmp=lambda x, y: list(x).index(1) - list(y).index(1)))
array([[ 1. ,  0.5,  0.5,  0. ],
       [ 0. ,  1. ,  0. ,  0.5],
       [ 0.5,  0.5,  1. ,  0. ],
       [ 0. ,  0.5,  0.5,  1. ]])

It actually sorts by rows, not columns (but the result is the same). It works by sorting by the index of the column the 1 is in.

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The standard library wins again. Any way to do this without having to use numpy lists? I can imagine this being fairly slow for a large array. –  jozzas Aug 22 '12 at 2:49
    
@jozzas: It actually doesn't rely on numpy at all. It'll work fine if you take out the np.array parts. –  Snowball Aug 22 '12 at 2:50
    
Sorry, I meant the python lists. Is there a numpy-only solution? –  jozzas Aug 22 '12 at 2:51
1  
@jozzas: I didn't see an obvious numpy-only solution. Maybe someone else can come up with one. –  Snowball Aug 22 '12 at 2:53
    
I think I've got one, don't know that it's much better than this though. –  jozzas Aug 22 '12 at 2:55

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