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The Intel manuals for the RDTSC instruction warn that out of order execution can change when RDTSC is actually executed, so they recommend inserting a CPUID instruction in front of it because CPUID will serialize the instruction stream (CPUID is never executed out of order). My question is simple: if they had the ability to make instructions serializing, why didn't they make RDTSC serializing? The entire point of it appears to be to get cycle accurate timings. Is there a situation under which you would not want to precede it with a serializing instruction?

Newer Intel CPUs have a separate RDTSCP instruction that is serializing. Intel opted to introduce a separate instruction rather than change the behavior of RDTSC, which suggests to me that there has to be some situation where a potentially out of order timing is what you want. What is it?

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Note the question/assertion posed at the end: "..there has to be some situation where a potentially out of order timing is what you want. What is it?" –  user166390 Aug 22 '12 at 3:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you are trying to use rdtsc to see if a branch mispredicts, the non-serializing version is what you want.

//math here
rdtsc
branch if zero to done
//do some work that always takes 1 cycle
done: rdtsc

If the branch is predicted correctly, the delta will be small (maybe even negative?). If the branch is mispredicted, the delta will be large.

With the serializing version, the branch condition will be resolved because the first rdtsc waits for the math to finish.

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Very interesting. You mean, assuming the branch isn't taken (since then the second rdtsc wouldn't run since we'd jump somewhere), and we want to check if it not being taken is predicted correctly, the second rdtsc will execute at the same time as the branch check (since the prediction is so the processor can pipeline), otherwise it won't be and the time will be larger. This assumes the CPU never speculatively executes both possibilities, but that was certainly true at the time (and maybe still is?). –  Joseph Garvin Aug 23 '12 at 15:48
    
I changed up the example to make the second rdtsc always execute. –  Danny Aug 23 '12 at 19:30

Because the time stamp counter was, from memory, introduced on the Pentium.

Out-of-order execution didn't show up until the Pentium Pro, at which point it was too late to change what the instruction did.

That's actually confirmed (obtusely) in the document you provide, with the following comment about Pentium and Pentium/MMX (in 4.2, slightly paraphrased):

All of the rules and code samples described in section 4.1 (Pentium Pro and Pentium II) also apply to the Pentium and Pentium/MMX. The only difference is, the CPUID instruction is not necessary for serialization.

And, from Wikipedia:

The Time Stamp Counter is a 64-bit register present on all x86 processors since the Pentium.

: : :

Starting with the Pentium Pro, Intel processors have supported out-of-order execution, where instructions are not necessarily performed in the order they appear in the executable. This can cause RDTSC to be executed later than expected, producing a misleading cycle count.


And, from what I understand, the primary use of RDTSCP (from the i7 onwards) is to give you the processor ID as well, since each processor maintains an independent TSC. It may well be serialising but I see that more of a simple "bug fix" over the older instruction.

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I disagree that the document confirms it. Prior to out of order execution, there was no concept of a serializing instruction since instructions were always serial. So when they introduced out of order execution if they had made RTDSC a serializing instruction there wouldn't have been any observable change in its behavior from earlier processors. –  Joseph Garvin Aug 22 '12 at 3:27
2  
@Joseph, I think you misunderstand what I'm saying it confirms. I'm not stating that what they did was correct, just that the timelines for timestamp counters and OOO execution were confirmed by that document. In fact, I believe what they did was wrong because they regressed the behaviour of RDTSC - it worked on the earlier processor and not on the latter one. I suspect someone didn't take into account OOOE until it was too late but that's just supposition on my part. –  paxdiablo Aug 22 '12 at 4:09
    
Ah, yes, I agree then, but my goal is to figure out whether it's an error on their part or something deliberate :) –  Joseph Garvin Aug 22 '12 at 4:47
    
Intel? Make a mistake? Not a chance. As sure as 4195835 divided by 3145727 equals 1.333739068902037589, they're infallible. Foof, I'm stunned that you would think this possible :-) –  paxdiablo Aug 22 '12 at 5:34

why didn't they make RDTSC serializing? The entire point of it appears to be to get cycle accurate timings

Well, most of the time it's to get high-resolution timestamps. At least some of the time, these timestamps are used for performance metrics. Making the intruction serializing would likely require a pipeline flush, which can be very expensive for CPU-bound applications.

Intel opted to introduce a separate instruction rather than change the behavior of RDTSC, which suggests to me that there has to be some situation where a potentially out of order timing is what you want.

Changing the behavior is almost always undesirable. Intel's customers would be disappointed to find out that RDTSC does something different on newer parts.

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Actually, they'd be used to that. The behaviour changed when switching from Pentium to Pentium Pro - it stopped giving useful results without serialising :-) But you're dead right about it being undesirable. –  paxdiablo Aug 22 '12 at 3:13
    
Making the instruction serializing would require a pipeline flush, but it seems that it's also necessary for your high resolution timestamps to be usable, thus my confusion. The purpose of getting the timestamps is to compare them or get the difference between them -- if you allow the instruction to be pipelined then you're not always measuring the same thing, right? –  Joseph Garvin Aug 22 '12 at 3:31
    
@JosephGarvin: In a pipelined CPU, the time required to execute a piece of code often isn't a clearly-defined number. Flushing the cache before taking measurements will give cause the measurements to yield a well-defined number, but that number will have less relationship to real-world performance than would a number measured without the cache flushing. –  supercat Nov 2 '14 at 19:27

As paxdiably explains, RDTSC predates the concept of "serializing" instructions because it was implemented on an in-order CPU. Adding that behavior later would change the memory access behavior of code using it, and thus be incompatible for some purposes.

Instead, more recent CPUs have a related RDTSCP instruction that is defined as serializing (actually stronger: it promises to wait until all instructions issued before it have completed, not just that memory accesses have been done), for exactly this reason. Use that if you are running on modern CPUs.

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"Adding that behavior later would change the memory access behavior of code using it, and thus be incompatible for some purposes." Except that I don't think it would. If they had had an out of order CPU before with rdtsc, then yes, making it serializing in later CPUs would be a behavior change. But when they introduced out of order execution, there couldn't be any older programs that depended on rdtsc being serializing because serializing as a concept only exists when you have out of order execution. So my thinking right now is that it was an oversight by Intel. –  Joseph Garvin Aug 22 '12 at 19:37

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