Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am learning algorithms and data structures and to train I am trying to design and implement a binary tree using objective-c. so far I have the following Classes: main -for testing Node - node of tree BinaryTree - for all methods related to the tree

One of the first methods in BinaryTree class I implemented is insertNode: forRoot:

-(void)insertNodeByRef:(Node **)node forRoot:(Node **)root{

    if(head == NULL)
    {
        head = *node;
    }
    //Case 2 root is null so can assign the value of the node to it
    if(root == NULL)
    {
        root = node;
    }
    else{
        if(node.data > root.data) // to the right
        {
            [self insertNode:node forRoot:root.right];
        }
        else if(node.data < root.data)//or to the left
        {
            [self insertNode:node forRoot:root.left];
        }
    }
}

Where the interface of Node class looks like:

@interface Node : NSObject
@property(nonatomic,assign)int data;
@property(nonatomic,strong) Node * right;
@property(nonatomic,strong) Node * left;


@end

My problem is that I don't know how to access the Node class member variables if I am passing Node as a reference. Whenever I try to access the node properties (like data, left or right) I am getting the following error message:

Member reference base type 'Node *__autoreleasing *' is not a structure or union

So my questions is: how can I access those properties (data, left or right) and use them to store either int data or reference to another Node?

Hope it makes sense. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Do you intend for users of BinaryTree to send the insertNodeByRef:forRoot: message? Why does it take pointers-to-pointers? –  rob mayoff Aug 22 '12 at 3:53
    
Because I am lost. I am trying to write back to Node referenced by root.right or by root.left. –  Janusz Chudzynski Aug 22 '12 at 4:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Your code is mixing two common approaches to the task, hence the problem. You are also using an abstract data type (ADT) type approach, rather than an object-oriented one, so there are three approaches to consider.

In both ADT approaches your tree is represented by a reference to its root, in Objective-C this is probably stored in an instance variable:

Node *TreeRoot;

Note also that both of these algorithms use field references, a->b, rather than property references, a.b - this is because the former references a variable and the second algorithm requires passing a reference to a variable.

Functional ADT: Pass-by-value and assign result

In this approach a node is inserted into a tree and a modified tree is returned which is assigned back, e.g. the top-level call to insert a Node nodeToInsert would be:

TreeRoot = insertNode(nodeToInsert, TreeRoot);

and the insertNode function looks like:

Node *insertNode(Node *node, Node *root)
{
   if(root == nil)
   {  // empty tree - return the insert node
      return node;
   }
   else
   {  // non-empty tree, insert into left or right subtree
      if(node->data > root->data) // to the right
      {
        root->right = insertNode(node, root->right);
      }
      else if(node->data < root->data)//or to the left
      {
        root->left = insertNode(node, root->left);
      }
      // tree modified if needed, return the root
      return root;
   }
}

Note that in this approach in the case of a non-empty (sub)tree the algorithm performs a redundant assignment into a variable - the assigned value is what is already in the variable... Because of this some people prefer:

Procedural ADT: Pass-by-reference

In this approach the variable holding the root of the (sub)tree is passed-by-reference, rather than its value being passed, and is modified by the called procedure as needed. E.g. the top-level call would be:

insertNode(nodeToInsert, &TreeRoot); // & -> pass the variable, not its value

and the insertNode procedure looks like:

void insertNode(Node *node, Node **root)
{
   if(*root == nil)
   {  // empty tree - insert node
      *root = node;
   }
   else
   {  // non-empty tree, insert into left or right subtree
      Node *rootNode = *root;
      if(node->data > rootNode->data) // to the right
      {
        insertNode(node, &rootNode->right);
      }
      else if(node->data < rootNode->data)//or to the left
      {
        insertNode(node, &root->left);
      }
   }
}

You can now see that your method is a mixture of the above two approaches. Both are valid, but as you are using Objective-C it might be better to take the third approach:

Object-Oriented ADT

This is a variation of the procedural ADT - rather than pass a variable to a procedure the variable, now called an object, owns a method which updates itself. Doing it this way means you must test for an empty (sub)tree before you make a call to insert a node, while the previous two approaches test in the call. So now we have the method in Node:

- (void) insert:(Node *)node
{
   if(node.data > self.data) // using properties, could also use fields ->
   {
      if(self.right != nil)
         [self.right insert:node];
      else
         self.right = node;
   }
   else if(node.data < rootNode.data)
   {
      if(self.left != nil)
         [self.left insert:node];
      else
         self.left = node;
   }
}

You also need to change the top level call to do the same test for an empty tree:

if(TreeRoot != nil)
   [TreeRoot insert:nodeToInsert];
else
   TreeRoot = nodeToInsert;

And a final note - if you are using MRC, rather than ARC or GC, for memory management you'll need to insert the appropriate retain/release calls.

Hope that helps you sort things out.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you so much! I tried to implement all versions of the Binary Tree and it works well with the functional and Object Oriented ADT. The Procedural ADT: Pass-by-reference gives me some errors: [self insertNodeByReference:node forRoot:&rootNode ->right]; Passing address of non-local object to __autoreleasing parameter for write-back –  Janusz Chudzynski Aug 22 '12 at 17:56
    
@JanuszChudzynski - The error you get with ARC & the procedural version is related to the inferred type of the parameter - which is Node * __autoreleasing *. With explicit types you can use something other than __autoreleasing to address the issue, but explaining what and why is a different subject altogether! For the moment if you're using ARC you might wish to avoid this style, when you're ready look up out parameters in relation to ARC. –  CRD Aug 22 '12 at 19:37
    
Extensive and very informative, thank you! –  ratsimihah Feb 25 at 2:03

First of all, don't write your methods to take Node **. It's just confusing.

Second, think about how it should work. Describe to yourself how it should work at a pretty abstract level. Translate that description directly into code, inventing new (not-yet-written!) messages where necessary. If there are steps you don't know how to do yet, just punt those off to new messages you'll write later. I'll walk you through it.

Presumably you want the public API of BinaryTree to include this message:

@interface BinaryTree

- (void)insertValue:(int)value;

So how do you implement insertValue:? Pretend you're the BinaryTree object. What's your high-level description of what you need to do to insert a value? You want to create a new Node. Then you want to insert that new Node into yourself. Translate that description directly into code:

@implementation BinaryTree {
    Node *root_; // root node, or nil for an empty tree
}

- (void)insertValue:(int)value {
    Node *node = [[Node alloc] initWithData:value];
    [self insertNode:node];
}

Now think about how you do the inserting. Well, if you are an empty tree, your root_ is nil and you can just set it to the new node. Otherwise, you can just ask your root node to insert the new node under himself. Translate that description directly into code:

- (void)insertNode:(Node *)node {
    if (root_ == nil) {
        root_ = node;
    } else {
        [root_ insertNode:node];
    }
}

Now pretend you're a Node. You've been asked to insert a new Node under yourself. How do you do it? You have to compare the new node's value to your value. If the new node's value is less than your value, you want to insert the new node on your left side. Otherwise, you want to insert it on your right side. Translate that description directly into code:

@implementation Node

- (void)insertNode:(Node *)node {
    if (node.data < self.data) {
        [self insertNodeOnLeftSide:node];
    } else {
        [self insertNodeOnRightSide:node];
    }
}

Now you're still a Node, and you've been asked to insert a new node on your left side. How do you do it? Well, if you don't have a child on your left side yet, just use the new node as your left child. Otherwise, you ask your left child to insert the new node under himself. Translate that description directly into code:

- (void)insertNodeOnLeftSide:(Node *)node {
    if (self.left == nil) {
        self.left = node;
    } else {
        [self.left insertNode:node];
    }
}

I'll leave the implementation of insertNodeOnRightSide: as an exercise for the reader. ;^)

share|improve this answer
    
This is a great solution. I love your approach. "Translate that description directly into code:" –  Schlank Apr 2 '14 at 5:57

Your code, in my opinion, has a lot of logic errors. Maybe consider reviewing what a pointer-to-pointer is to insure you're designing the desired effect. Likewise, you need to dereference node/root to access them in normal state. Otherwise, the error is valid, Node** is not type of structure or union.

share|improve this answer
    
I am trying to write back to Node referenced by root.right or by root.left. I am not sure how to achieve it. –  Janusz Chudzynski Aug 22 '12 at 4:32

(Node **)node is a pointer to an object pointer so node.something is invalid because you are a reference to far away from the object.

But (*node).something will work.


Addition for comments :
When you originally call this method : -(void)insertNodeByRef:(Node **)node forRoot:(Node **)root how do you call it?
From the error you've post in your comment it look to me that you are doing :
Node *n = [[Node alloc] init];
[aNode insertNodeByRef:n forRoot:aRoot];

when your method signature state that you need to call it like this :
[aNode insertNodeByRef:&n forRoot:&aRoot];
To pass the address of the pointer to the object.

I'm saying this because your error is now stating that your are sending Node * instead of Node ** which are 2 different thing. (( Incompatible pointer types sending 'Node *' to parameter of type 'Node **' ) I've remove the __autoreleasing between the 2 *, it was obscuring the error message.)
So in other word you are passing a pointer to an object when your method is asking for a pointer TO A pointer to an object.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately it gives me following error and warning. Implicit conversion of an Objective-C pointer to 'Node *__autoreleasing *' is disallowed with ARC Incompatible pointer types sending 'Node *' to parameter of type 'Node *__autoreleasing *' –  Janusz Chudzynski Aug 22 '12 at 4:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.