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Fairly new to Java, so I hope the wording makes sense.

I have some Java code that needs to be called a few times within a public method, how can I reuse that code by placing it inside the public method and calling it?

Maybe I am making things hard for myself, so here's the code sample.

public static final String parseText( final String text )
{
    StringBuffer parsedText = new StringBuffer();

    private static void appendParsedText( String snippet )
    {
        if ( parsedText.length() > 0 )
        {
            parsedText.append( ", " + snippet );
        }
        parsedText.append( snippet );
    }

    if ( text.contains( "string1" ) )
    {
        parsedText.appendParsedText("string1");
    }

    if ( text.contains( "string2" ) )
    {
        parsedText.appendParsedText("string2");
    }

    if ( text.contains( "string3" ) )
    {
        parsedText.appendParsedText("string3");
    }

    return parsedText.toString();
}

Although the code is invalid, hopefully it makes sense with what I'm trying to achieve. I know there's a join() method in Apache Commons StringUtils but it seems like overkill, this method is the only place where this needs to happen.

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1  
can't do this. but no need, just declare it as a regular private method. –  Dmitry Beransky Aug 22 '12 at 4:34
    
@DmitryBeransky I've posted an answer to the question, is that what you're talking about? Is there no way to define another method that will only be used inside the parseText method? –  Nathan Aug 22 '12 at 5:53

2 Answers 2

As you said, the code is not compiling as Java doesn't support such a construct. I would suggest you define the parseText() and appendParsedText() separately and just call the private method from the public one.

So it would look like this:

public static final String parseText( final String text ) {
    return appendParsedText(text);
}

private static String appendParsedText( String snippet ) {
    StringBuffer parsedText = new StringBuffer();
    if ( parsedText.length() > 0 ) {
        parsedText.append( ", " + snippet );
    }
    parsedText.append( snippet );

    if ( text.contains( "string1" ) ) {
        accessTypes.appendAccessTypes("string1");
    }

    if ( text.contains( "string2" ) ) {
        accessTypes.appendAccessTypes("string2");
    }

    if ( text.contains( "string3" ) ) {
        accessTypes.appendAccessTypes("string3");
    }

    return parsedText.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Dan, thanks for trying to answer my question. Unfortunately I had typos in the sample code so the sample code probably made no sense and you worked with what you had. –  Nathan Aug 22 '12 at 5:25
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would assume that the following works, but I'm defining a method in my class that is only being used in one other method of the class. To me this seems a little wasteful.

private static final StringBuffer appendParsedText( StringBuffer parsedText, String snippet )
{
    if ( parsedText.length() > 0 )
    {
        return parsedText.append( ", " + snippet );
    }
    return parsedText.append( snippet );
}

public static final String parseAccess( final String text )
{
    StringBuffer parsedText = new StringBuffer();

    if ( text.contains( "string1" ) )
    {
        parsedText = appendParsedText( parsedText, "string1" );
    }

    if ( text.contains( "string2" ) )
    {
        parsedText = appendParsedText( parsedText, "string2" );
    }

    if ( text.contains( "string3" ) )
    {
        parsedText = appendParsedText( parsedText, "string3" );
    }

    return parsedText.toString();
}
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