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Is there a way to have two functions share a variable without making it global and without being able to pass it? Or is there a way to pass a function a variable when using signal()?

Specifically I have a main() opening a file and working on it and keeping it open for quite a while. There is a small function that accepts the fd (and some other info) main() calls when it is done with the file.

I'm now trying to make things more robust by catching fatal signals and taking care of things if needed. Although I can't figure out how I can do this without making fd and all other needed variables global. Something I would rather avoid.

(void)signal(SIGINT, die);

die

static void die(int sig)
{
    endTrip(fd, &tripID); //Quickly writes a footer and fcloses
    exit(sig);
}

Is there a better solution than making everything global?

EDIT

Is something like this possible

static void die(int sig, FILE *fd)
{
    const FILE *local_fd;
    if(sig == NULL)
        {local_fd = fd;}
    else
    {
        endTrip(local_fd, &tripID); //Quickly writes a footer and fcloses 
        exit(sig);
    }
}


main() {
  ...
  // When i open new file let die know.
  die(NULL, fd);
  ...
}
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4 Answers 4

static void die(int sig, FILE *fd) { 
    static const FILE *local_fd;
    if(sig == NULL) {
        local_fd = fd;
    }
    ...

I assume that you wanted to keep using your local_fd at the next function call, which is why you have to declare it as static const FILE *.

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The normal way to share a variable between two or more functions in a single file (without making it global so that it is visible in other files) is to make it into a static variable. Note that 'fd' is normally used as the abbreviation for 'file descriptor' (which is an int); you normally use the abbreviation 'fp' for a FILE *:

static FILE *local_fp;
static void die(int signum);

int main(void)
{
    local_fp = fopen("...");
    signal(SIGINT, die);
    ...
    ...use local_fp...
    fclose(local_fp);
    local_fp = 0;
    ...
    return(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

static void die(int signum)
{
    if (local_fp != 0)
        fclose(local_fp);
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

That shows two functions, both of which are able to access the variable local_fp. Short of passing a value or pointer between two functions as an argument, or various tricks with shared memory that end up using a variable (global, static or passed as an argument to functions) to access the shared memory, there's no way for a pair of functions to share access to a variable.

I'm not quite sure what to make of your functions, and I'm not quite sure how signals fit into the mixture either.

Note that you should write int main(void) to be explicit about the return type. C99 does not permit you to omit the return type (nor does C11).

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Signal handlers are already global state. If you're using one, then you've already passed the point of no return and you're already using a global variable, albeit one that's usually hidden in kernelspace (the signal handler pointer). At this point, it's no big deal to add another global variable for the argument and be done with it.

With that said, you should probably consider whether your entire design is valid. Using stdio from a signal handler is not valid except in very specific situations that are hard to guarantee. In your case, since the code that got interrupted by the signal handler seems to be operating on the same FILE stream, it's almost surely invalid to touch it from the signal handler.

Also, you might consider what would happen if your program is, or is ever adapted to be, multi-threaded. There's only one set of signal handlers for the whole process, but multiple files might be being written in different threads.

There are lots of different approaches you can take to solving problems like this, but the simplest and most portable one is to open a pipe back to yourself and have the signal handler do nothing but write a single byte to the pipe. Then your main loop code can detect input on the reading end of the pipe (with select or poll, for example) and act on it outside of a signal handler context, in its own context where it has access to its own local variables, etc.

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I don't see another solution to make all variables global, to make things cleaner, maybe you can create a structure which contains all variables.

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