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I have two process'es like below.

If say A=1, B=2 and C=3, what happens in simulation is on rising_edge B=1 and C=2, which is the result I want.

But am I guaranteed that this is also true when the design is implemented into an fpga?

What worries me is the delay associated with the extra if-state in process BC.

AB : process(A,clk)
begin
  if rising_edge(clk) then
    B <= A;
  end if;
end process;

BC : process(B,clk)
begin
  if rising_edge(clk) then
    if (some_statement) then
      C <= B;
    end if;
  end if;
end process;
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I'm going to guess that this is VHDL based on your other questions. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 22 '12 at 5:34
    
No not exactly. My other question was about best timing. I think this more a good design practice. IMHO –  JakobJ Aug 22 '12 at 6:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

B will take on the value of A (B=1) and C will take on the value of B (C=2).

However, I guess you are not actually describing what you want to. The problem is that you have A and B in the sensitivity list of the two processes. This means that in process AB, B will change each time A changes as well as when rising_edge(clk) is true. The same holds for process BC. Assuming you want to describe two registers in series, your code should be

AB : process(clk)
begin
  if rising_edge(clk) then
    B <= A;
  end if;
end process;

BC : process(clk)
begin
  if rising_edge(clk) then
    if (some_statement) then
      C <= B;
    end if;
  end if;
end process;

In this case, if you synthesize this code onto an FPGA, you will infer two registers. The register in process BC will use the registers enable signal which is connected to the boolean output of some_statement. If some_statement is already a single std_logic signal, this will not introduce additional delay but require some routing ressources, so you should still avoid using the enable signal where you don't really need it.

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Thanks! I'm a mainly a hw engineer, but I have been done a lot of c-programming earlier, which makes my brain hurt when trying to do vhdl. I know that I have to think of it as hardware, but sometimes my mind plays tricks on me. ;-) –  JakobJ Aug 22 '12 at 11:02

I think Simon answered the question perfectly, just to clarify the issue a bit further: If initial values of your data is A=1, B=2 and C=3 then you will have the following during the simulation:

  • During start A=1, B=2 and C=3
  • After first rising edge of the clock A=1, B=1 and C=2
  • After second rising edge of the clock A=1, B=1 and C=1
  • After that, all signals will be 1.

The delay of the if statement must be more than 'clock period' - 'hold time necessary for internal registers' to cause any problem for you. Unless you have an extremely complicated logic with signals from multiple clock domains there, there is a little risk you get into problem with your code (the more accurate code is the one sent by Simon).

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But am I guaranteed that this is also true when the design is implemented into an fpga?

The synthesizer ought to produce an FPGA which matches the behaviour of your VHDL in the simulator. If not, it's a bug!

Note that there are some "accepted" deviations - for example, if you miss a right-hand side signal off the sensitivity list, the synthesizer will assume you meant to put it there, but the simulator will assume you know what you're doing, and there will be a mismatch. Personally, I regard that behaviour as a bug, but it is too firmly entrenched by too many tools, I don't see it ever changing.

What worries me is the delay associated with the extra if-state in process BC.

Everything in a clocked process like yours "executes" within a single clock tick. If there is too much logic (for example, each nested if introduces a new layer of logic), you may find that a clock tick has to last longer than you desire.

(Not like software on most modern micros, where everything "takes as long as it takes", and is often unpredictable, depending on the state of caches, TLBs etc.)

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