Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a Basewebpage class having many common functions like filling up dropdowns, formating , return formatted datatable and so on..

What would be a good approach.

Public Class BaseWebPage
{
 ...

    public static DataTable Static_GetPersonDataTable()
    {
        DataTable dt = new DataTable();
        dt.Columns.Add("Name");
        dt.Columns.Add("Age");

        return dt;
    }
  ...
    public DataTable NonStatic_GetPersonDataTable()
    {
        DataTable dt = new DataTable();
        dt.Columns.Add("Name");
        dt.Columns.Add("Age");

        return dt;
    }
}

This is how both can be called

DataTable dt1 = BaseWebPage.Static_GetPersonDataTable();  // calling static method
...
BaseWebPage pageBase = new BaseWebPage();
DataTable dt2 = pageBase.NonStatic_GetPersonDataTable();  // calling non-static method

Few questions in above scenario

  • Will both method return new instance of a datatable or static will always return the same?
  • During heavy load (Many requests) case will there be any thread related issue for any of these?
  • If there are no side effects which is preferable over other? Why?

if you can write little bit descriptive it will be really helpful.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

•Will both method return new instance of a datatable or static will always return the same?

Yes they will return a new instance.

•During heavy load (Many requests) case will there be any thread related issue for any of these?

No unless you use shared state in your methods. Currently they don't but they may. Even the instance methods may use shared state. This is not related to staticness (staticity?)

•If there are no side effects which is preferable over other? Why?

It doesn't really matter but I would go for instance methods. At some point you may want to add tests and you can extract the methods in an interface and mock the object.

Bonus point: DataTables suck! Avoid them and use classes/objects.

share|improve this answer
    
I just put Datatable for example, we hardly use it. However can you suggest some links or good articless about general format of 3 tier architecture in LINQ-to-SQL case discussing how classes, methods, static variables and methods and other things should be encapsulated Thanks a lot stilgar –  v s Aug 22 '12 at 7:26
    
I can't think of any articles about 3 tier architecture with LINQ to SQL. I'll have to Google but you can do this too. However I can recommend that you use the MVP pattern (there is a framework to help you use the pattern but you can implement the pattern yourself pretty easily) if you are working with Web Forms. Also if you can work with .NET 4.5 you should use ModelBinders and if not you should wrap your LINQ queries in ObjectDataSource and interface with the controls in this way. –  Stilgar Aug 22 '12 at 8:36
    
A reasonable way to use LINQ to SQL is to create one DataContext when the request starts and stick it into HttpContext.Current.Items (of course you should wrap access to it in a method) and dispose it when the request finishes. There are other more advanced ways to manage the lifetime of your datacontext like the unit of work pattern but I often find them an overkill. –  Stilgar Aug 22 '12 at 8:38
add comment

Personally i would let all your pages be a child class of this baseWebPage.
You'd have safe access to all methods without having to instantiate the BaseWebPage class or even typing the name(when going static).

Code would ook like this :
All your web pages(assuming you're using webforms not mvc):

public partial class Index : BaseWebPage{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e){
        var data = GetPersonDataTable();
    }
}

Your baseWebPage :

Public Class BaseWebPage : System.Web.UI.Page{
    protected DataTable GetPersonDataTable(){
        //Do your thing
    }
}

about the safety and behavior : that depends on how you write your code inside these methods.
But in both static and non static you can safely have multi threads returning multiple different instances of your DataTable.
If intended however you could also return the same instance every time. It would depend on the code and the resources you are using.

share|improve this answer
    
That's how exactly we have done. However we have a separate control folder and all controls files are there. Again we have BaseControlPage from which we derive each of our control. But then we have few general methods in the BaseWebPage that need to be called on these control codebehind as well and that's why we want to keep those general method static so that we can call it by BaseWebPage class name –  v s Aug 22 '12 at 7:46
    
Aha i see. Not that it matters much but for elegance i don't mix those 2. I would create a new static class called Helper and call the helper's static methods from both the BasePage and the general methods –  Kristof Aug 22 '12 at 7:59
    
We have static utility class too. Some of the general functions we have in the basewebpage do make a call to database to fill up dropdown, populate checked listbox and so on and we have created static BL objects on the BaseWebPage so that it can be used everywhere. Just to clarify our BL does not have any member variables and properties only methods calling DL methods and some formating logic only. Actual BL is in Stored Procs –  v s Aug 22 '12 at 11:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.