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The Python yield keyword explained

Can someone explain to me what the yield statement actually does in this bit of code here:

 def fibonacci():
     a, b = 0, 1
     while True:
         yield a
         a, b = b, a+b

for number in fibonacci(): # Use the generator as an iterator; print number

What I understand so far is, we are defining a function finonacci(), with no parameters? inside the function we are defining a and b equal to 0 and 1, next, while this is true, we are yielding a. What is this actually doing? Furthermore, while yielding a? a is now equal to b, while b is now equal to a + b.

Next question, for number in fibonacci(), does this mean for every number in the function or what? I'm equally stumped on what yield and 'for number' are actually doing. Obviously I am aware that it means for every number in fibonacci() print number. Am I actually defining number without knowing it?

Thanks, sorry if I'm not clear. BTW, it's for project Euler, if I knew how to program well this would be a breeze but I'm trying to learn this on the fly.

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marked as duplicate by lvc, pst, Scott Griffiths, monkut, delnan Aug 22 '12 at 9:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Using yield makes the function a generator. The generator will continue to yield the a variable on each loop, waiting until the generator's next() method is called to continue on to the next loop iteration.

Or, until you return or StopIteration is raised.

Slightly modified to show use of StopIteration:

>>> def fib():
...     a = 0
...     b = 1
...     while True:
...         yield a
...         a = b
...         b += a
...         if a > 100:
...             raise StopIteration
...
>>>
>>> for value in fib():
...     print value
...
0
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
>>>

>>> # assign the resulting object to 'generator'
>>> generator = fib()
>>> generator.next()
0
>>> generator.next()
1
>>> for value in generator:
...     print value
...
2
4
8
16
32
64
>>>
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3  
There is no need to raise StopIteration inside a generator - just return. – lvc Aug 22 '12 at 8:15

When the code calls fibonacci a special generator object is created. Please note, that no code gets executed - only a generator object is returned. When you are later calling its next method, the function executes until it encounters a yield statement. The object that is supplied to yield is returned. When you call next method again the function executes again until it encounters a yield. When there are no more yield statements and the end of function is reached, a StopIteration exception is raised.

Please note that the objects inside the function are preserved between the calls to next. It means, when the code continues execution on the next loop, all the objects that were in the scope from which yield was called have their values from the point where a previous next call returned.

The cool thing about generators is that they allow convenient iteration with for loops. The for loop obtains a generator from the result of fibonacci call and then executes the loop retrieving elements using next method of generatior object until StopIteration exception is encountered.

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4  
Calling fibonacci() again will create a new generator. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 22 '12 at 8:13
    
What do you mean return a immediately, it holds the value a for the next loop? – Dewclaw Aug 22 '12 at 8:14
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams Thanks, I tried to write a very simple explanation, but wrote something completely invalid and embarrassing. Corrected the answer accordingly. – Maksim Skurydzin Aug 22 '12 at 8:49

Generators have a special property of being iterables which do not consume memories for their values.

They do this by calculating the new value, when it is required while being iterated.

i.e.

def f():
    a = 2
    yield a
    a += 1

for ele in f():
    print ele

would print

 2

So you are using a function as an iterable that keeps returning values. This is especially useful when you require heavy memory usage, and so you cannot afford the use of a list comprehension

i.e.

li = [ele*10 for ele in range(10)]

takes 10 memory spaces for ints as a list

but if you simple want to iterate over it, not access it individually

it would be very memory efficient to instead use

def f():
    i=0
    while i<10
        yield i*10
        i += 1

which would use 1 memory space as i keeps being reused

a short cut for this is

ge = (i*10 for i in range(10))

you can do any of the following

for ele in f():

for ele in li:

for ele in ge:

to obtain equivalent results

share|improve this answer

This answer is a great explanation of the yield statement, and also of iterators and generators.

Specifically here, the first call to fibonaci() will initialize a to 0, b to 1, enter the while loop and return a. Any next call will start after the yield statement, affect b to a, a+b to b, and then go to the next iteration of the while statement, reach again the yield statement, and return a again.

share|improve this answer
    
So up until the yield statement, everything before it is just laying down the initial values? Then after the statement, it just executes a, b = b, a+b – Dewclaw Aug 22 '12 at 8:20
    
The first statement a, b = 0, 1 is indeed for initialization purpose. It is only executed on the first call to fibonaci(). – dureuill Aug 22 '12 at 8:23

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