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I have this simple singleton that is used for keyboard polling, it implements the keyListener only to change the state of a Boolean. I get the keyListener object via get getKeyListener(). I'm not sure if this is the way to go, but the code works. Might there be a better way of accomplishing this?

UPDATE: Simpler way to poll key inputs using bitset

package Singleton;

import java.awt.event.KeyEvent;
import java.awt.event.KeyListener;
import java.util.BitSet;

public enum bitKeyProcessor implements KeyListener{

INSTANCE;

private final BitSet bitset = new BitSet();

@Override
public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
    bitset.set(e.getKeyCode());
}

@Override
public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {
    try{bitset.clear(e.getKeyCode());}
    catch(Exception ex) {ex.printStackTrace();}
}

public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e) {};

public boolean isUp(){
    if(bitset.get(KeyEvent.VK_UP))
        return true;    
    return false;
}

....

public boolean isUpRight(){
    if( isUp() && isRight())
        return true;
    return false;
}
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1  
Well the code looks ok to me, Joshua Bloch would certanly appreciate using the enum to create a Singleton. –  Shivan Dragon Aug 22 '12 at 8:20
    
Why???!! What's wrong with a plain old class with instance fields? (Also, I don't think there's any specified limited range on key codes. IIRC, the numeric keypad enter key on Solaris used to give a quite high value. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 22 '12 at 9:17
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The first thing that I would ask is why doesn't your enum implement KeyListener interface itself ? This would make your code more readable and would get rid of any need for statics (other than the INSTANCE, of course).

enum eSingleton implements KeyListener {
    INSTANCE;

    private boolean[] keyUp = new boolean[256];
    private boolean[] keyDown = new boolean[256];
    private boolean listen;

    public void update(){
        keyUp = new boolean[256];
    }

    public void listen(final boolean startStop){
        listen = startStop;
    }

    public boolean isKeyUp(int key){
        return keyUp[key];
    }

    public boolean isKeyDown(int key){
        return keyDown[key];
    }

    @Override
    public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
        keyUp[e.getKeyCode()] = false;
        keyDown[e.getKeyCode()] = true;
    }

    @Override
    public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {
        keyUp[e.getKeyCode()] = true;
        keyDown[e.getKeyCode()] = false;
    }

    @Override
    public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e) {}
}
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I don't think there is problem with your singleton I am just not sure about the code inside it.

Rather than creating two separate boolean arrays for Key Up/Down why not implement a KeyProcessor.

Whenever key event is received send keycode to Keyporcessor with action associate with it

e.g.

  KeyProcessor.sendKeyEvent(keycode, PRESSED);
  KeyProcessor.sendKeyEvent(keycode, RELEASED);
  KeyProcessor.sendKeyEvent(keycode, TYPED);

Now create a command map in which you will have Hashmap with keys constructed using keycode & command.

Hashmap.put(keycode, PROCCESS_KEY_A)

enum command
{
PROCCESS_KEY_A;
pressed(){};
released(){};
typed(){};
}

sendKeyEvent will invoke method based on key event of the enum retrieved from command map.

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I get what you're saying, but I don't understand your code , could you explain ? also how is this way better than what I have? –  EdQ3 Aug 22 '12 at 21:56
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