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Some algorithms execute a while loop with condition true and will (for sure) end at some point with a return statement inside the body of the while loop. E.g.:

def foo: Int = {
  while(true) {
    // At some time, the while loop will do a return statement inside its body
    if( ... )
      return 0
  }
}

Simple example (without semantic sense):

def foo: Int = {
  var i = 0
  while(true) {
    i += 1
    if(i == 10)
      return 0
  }
}

The Scala compiler complains about a type mismatch, because the while loop has type Unit and the compiler does not know, that the while loop will at some point return a value. We could fix this with a workaround like:

def foo: Int = {
  var i = 0
  while(true) {
    i += 1
    if(i == 10)
      return 0
  }
  0 // !
}

But this looks ugly. Is there a better workaround ? Or even a better solution for this kind of problem ?

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2  
Why don't you put the test condition where you have true? –  some Aug 22 '12 at 9:43
2  
Please does not use a while(true) ... Or ELSE, use an actor, a Future or any structure in concurrent computing that take care of the absence of terminaison. –  jwinandy Aug 22 '12 at 10:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You could throw an exception:

def foo: Int = {
  var i = 0
  while(true) {
    i += 1
    if(i == 10)
      return 0
  }
  throw new IllegalStateException("This should never happen")
}

The compiler will stop complaining about the type mismatch, and since the while loop always returns something, the exception will never be thrown. And if it is, you will quickly find out where you did something wrong :).

There are other ways to write this loop which are more idomatic and Scala-esque, but given the code you provided, this will get the job done in a clear and simple way.

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1  
Nice! It' worth noting that this works because the throw expression has type Nothing, which is a subtype of everything—including Int. –  DaoWen Aug 22 '12 at 9:42
    
I am not into Exception with Scala (or while(true) ...), but sincerely, nice one for the minimalist code change. –  jwinandy Aug 22 '12 at 10:21
    
@jqno Thank you, great solution. –  John Threepwood Aug 22 '12 at 12:35

Maybe you should just use tail recursion instead. It should end up compiling down to very similar bytecode:

import scala.annotation.tailrec

def foo: Int = {
  @tailrec def bar(i: Int): Int = {
    val j = i + 1
    if (j == 10) return 0
    else bar(j)
  }
  bar(0)
}

You might even want to make use of the default parameter value support:

@tailrec def foo(i: Int = 0): Int = {
  val j = i + 1
  if (j == 10) return 0
  else foo(j)
}

Note that this way requires you to call the function as foo() not foo since it has an argument.

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A more idiomatic way would be to use recursion. Something like this:

  def foo: Int = { 
    import scala.annotation.tailrec
    @tailrec def whileUnderTen(i: Int):Int = if ( i < 10) whileUnderTen(i+1) else 0
    whileUnderTen(0)
  }
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WHY is this the preferred idiom? To me, the need for a helper function to handle the recursion is just distracting boiler plate, and so "recursion is better"just feels like dogma. I've never understood what the arguments are against a loop which does stuff, returning when it's done (e.g. as implemented in collectFirst). Enlightenment sought! –  Paul Aug 22 '12 at 11:04
3  
@Paul - It's slightly easier to avoid forgetting to increment a loop (e.g. the compiler will complain that you aren't returning a value if you forget a branch), and it's also usually slightly easier to verify that any state that gets updated is in fact updated (since you pass it in). I still often prefer while loops (less boilerplate for simple cases, sometimes more obvious termination condition), but they both have their strengths. –  Rex Kerr Aug 22 '12 at 11:22
    
Right. It's just to me that the response "recursion is better" is a bit unthinking at times (not necessarily in Jan's case here, I hasten to add!). While (or for) loops aren't automatically a code smell, IMO. –  Paul Aug 22 '12 at 11:40
    
Instead of a while and a var definition you have a def and one invokation. I don't consider this to be more boilerplate then the imperative while. ;-) One advantage of recursive methods / functions is that you can reuse them (not in this simple example of course) –  Jan Aug 22 '12 at 12:48

For just these occasions, I have a "forever" construct defined in my personal standard library.

forever{
}

is in all ways equivalent to

while(true){
}

except that forever has type Nothing while the equivalent while construct has type Unit. Just one of those small extension capabilities that makes Scala such a joy.

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