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I have a fairly horrible query using 2 "IN" statements that needs running on our database. Firstly the schema (Simplified for this example):

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[SystemUser]
(
    [SystemUserID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [FirstName] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
    [Surname] [nvarchar](50) NULL
    CONSTRAINT [PK_ApplicationUser] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
    (
        [SystemUserID] ASC
    )
)
GO

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Group]
(
    [GroupID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Name] [nvarchar](50) NULL
    CONSTRAINT [PK_Group] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
    (
        [GroupID] ASC
    )
)
GO

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[GroupMembership]
(
    [SystemUserID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [GroupID] [int] NOT NULL
    CONSTRAINT [PK_GroupMembership] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
    (
        [SystemUserID] ASC,
        [GroupID] ASC
    )
)
GO

What I want to do is find all "SystemUser" records that match a list of SystemUserIDs that do NOT have membership to a "Group" that is in a list of GroupIDs.

So 2 seperate lists of IDs beng compared in one query. The fastest way I can think of doing this currently is below:

SELECT SU.SystemUserID
FROM [dbo].[SystemUser] SU 
LEFT JOIN
(
    SELECT GM.SystemUserID
    FROM [dbo].[GroupMembership] GM
    WHERE GM.GroupID IN
    (
        1, 7, 8, 10, 32
    )
) GM ON GM.SystemUserID = SU.SystemUserID
WHERE SU.SystemUserID IN
(
    10, 61, 80, 93, 98
)
AND GM.SystemUserID IS NULL /* Not matched */

Is there anything I'm missing; would a "WHERE NOT EXISTS" check be more efficient? Or can you think of a better way of processing and filtering by the two lists?

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Do you only need SystemUserID from SystemUser or is it only for a sample purpose here? –  Kuba Wyrostek Aug 22 '12 at 9:58
    
I only need the id brought back; in context this query is being used to filter a list of SystemUserIDs –  Click-Rex Aug 22 '12 at 10:12
2  
No syntax is inherently 'better' than another. I usually encourage people to write queries using whatever syntax seems most logical to them, and only modify if performance is not as good as is needed, or some other criteria is not being met. I'm sorry this is an 'it depends' answer, but it totally does. Which performs best in practice many factors including how many items are in each list, data distribution, indexes, constraints, parallelism, etc. For this query, I would probably use NOT EXISTS, but that's just my preference. Post actual execution plans somewhere if you encounter problems. –  Paul White Aug 22 '12 at 10:26
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming SQL Server 2005 or later,

SELECT SU.SystemUserID
FROM [dbo].[SystemUser] SU 
WHERE SU.SystemUserID IN
(
    10, 61, 80, 93, 98
)
EXCEPT
SELECT GM.SystemUserID
FROM [dbo].[GroupMembership] GM
WHERE GM.GroupID IN
(
    1, 7, 8, 10, 32
)
share|improve this answer
    
I like the syntax; definitely one to keep an eye on. Running with the execution plan; with 14 ids in both lists the query cost of the EXCEPT version is 49% whilst the original version is 51%; so it does provide a minor performance improvement –  Click-Rex Aug 22 '12 at 10:08
2  
@Click-Rex Please don't use estimated cost percentages to judge plans, particularly across batches. The numbers are internal optimizer estimates used to choose between plan alternatives for the same query; they are not intended for the use you are putting them to. Compare whatever metric is important to you instead. Popular ones include execution time, CPU usage, memory requirement, I/O generated...and so on. –  Paul White Aug 22 '12 at 10:19
    
Fair enough @SQLkiwi I'll have a look at the client statistics instead. –  Click-Rex Aug 22 '12 at 10:25
    
I went for this method; apart from the improved performance it is also much nicer syntaxically and easier to convert to LinqToSql in C# (Translating to users.Except(userGroupMemberships)) Cheers @AakashM –  Click-Rex Aug 22 '12 at 10:33
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Rather than use IN (which emits separate queries), use BETWEEN to enclose ranges:

SELECT SU.SystemUserID 
FROM [dbo].[SystemUser] SU  
LEFT JOIN 
( 
    SELECT GM.SystemUserID 
    FROM [dbo].[GroupMembership] GM 
    WHERE GM.GroupID BETWEEN 1 AND 5

) GM ON GM.SystemUserID = SU.SystemUserID 
WHERE SU.SystemUserID BETWEEN 10 AND 14
AND GM.SystemUserID IS NULL /* Not matched */

If your ranges are not at all sequential, create a temp table (or CTE), populate with values and then inner join to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah sorry Mitch; I didn't mention the integer lists may not be sequential (I'll update the example) though great point in the context. –  Click-Rex Aug 22 '12 at 9:50
1  
where possible, break into sequential ranges.... –  Mitch Wheat Aug 22 '12 at 9:51
    
Interesting point; like it! Ok so multiple BETWEEN statements would be more efficient than an IN query? Even in if the list of integers gets to around 100 items? –  Click-Rex Aug 22 '12 at 9:53
    
IMO only in SystemUser's clustered key, no use in GroupMembership though. –  Kuba Wyrostek Aug 22 '12 at 9:54
2  
A single range scan can be more efficient than multiple singleton seeks (see sqlblog.com/blogs/paul_white/archive/2011/02/17/…) but it is not always the case. If BETWEEN fits your use case, you may find it performs better, but you need to test with your database. Second point: temporary tables and CTEs are not interchangeable. Temporary tables are separate entities, CTEs are 'inline views' and do not force a materialization point. –  Paul White Aug 22 '12 at 10:37
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Few problem queries can be solved by rewriting the text of the query, and yours is no exception. The culprit of performance problems almost always is missing indexes, and again yours is no exception.

SELECT SU.SystemUserID
FROM [dbo].[SystemUser] SU 
LEFT JOIN
(
    SELECT GM.SystemUserID
    FROM [dbo].[GroupMembership] GM
    WHERE GM.GroupID IN
    (
        1, 7, 8, 10, 32
    )
) GM ON GM.SystemUserID = SU.SystemUserID
WHERE SU.SystemUserID IN
(
    10, 61, 80, 93, 98
)
AND GM.SystemUserID IS NULL /* Not matched */

So you need:

  1. GroupID index on GroupMembership
  2. SystemUserID index on SystemUser
  3. SystemUserID index on GroupMembership (for the join)

You DDL (that's for adding it!) reveals that you have solved 2) and 3), but not 1). So add the missing index:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX idx_GroupMembership_GroupID ON GroupMembership(GroupID, SystemUserID)

As a rule of thumb: many-to-many tables of the form (leftId, rightId) always need both an index on (leftId, rightId) and one on (rightId, leftId).

share|improve this answer
    
+1. nice answer. –  Mitch Wheat Aug 22 '12 at 13:15
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In my experience I have more often got better results from joining to a temp table with the desired values in it rather than using IN when the value list increases. with 100 values, I'd got that way first by habit but would probably write up both and compare plans and statistics before it goes live.

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