Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I am writing a program to implement a stack which works like a real world stack means it topples when the size of a stack reaches threshold and therefore need to create a new stack for inserting that new element.

Below is my program for this:

#include <iostream>
#include<vector>
#include<stack>

using namespace std;

class stack_of_plates
{
   vector<stack<int> > stacks;
   unsigned int stack_size;
   public:
   stack_of_plates(unsigned int size=100)
   {
       stack_size=size;
   }

   void push(int data)
   {
       if(stacks.empty())
       {
           stack<int> *sptr= new stack<int>; //on debugging Segmentation fault at thisline
           stacks.push_back(*sptr);
       }

       vector<stack<int> >::iterator it=stacks.end();
       if(it->size()==stack_size)
       {
           stack<int> *sptr= new stack<int>; //on debugging Segmentation fault at thisline
           stacks.push_back(*sptr);
       }
       it->push(data);
   }

   void pop()
   {
       if(stacks.empty())
       {
           cout<<"\nEmpty Stack";
           return ;
       }
       vector<stack<int> >::iterator it=stacks.end();
       if(it->empty())
       {
           it--;
       }
       it->pop();
   }
   int top()
   {
       if(stacks.empty())
       {
           cout<<"\nEmpty Stack";
           return 0;
       }
       vector<stack<int> >::iterator it=stacks.end();
       if(it->empty())
       {
           it--;
       }
       return it->top();
   }
};


int main()
{
   stack_of_plates ss;
   ss.push(1);
   ss.push(2);
   cout<<ss.top();
   return 0;
}

On compiling it gives no error or warning. However program terminates with unusual error. On debugging its giving segmentation fault error indicating problem in allocating new stack. Kindly help me how should i change my code while allocating the new stack. Please help me removing this error.

share|improve this question
1  
What is the "programming error" exactly? – amit Aug 22 '12 at 10:14
1  
and the question/error is ? – MimiEAM Aug 22 '12 at 10:14
2  
Noo, that's not what they mean by "stack pointer"... – Kerrek SB Aug 22 '12 at 10:17
4  
This is complete bogus: stack<int> *sptr= new stack<int>; stacks.push_back(*sptr);. It should be either stacks.push_back(stack<int>());, or stacks.emplace_back();, or stacks.resize(stacks.size() + 1); – Kerrek SB Aug 22 '12 at 10:18
2  
Two points: If you allocate the stack on the heap and then push them like you do, you will have a memory leak, as you push a copy onto the stack. Second is that generic_container.end() doesn't return the last entry in generic_container, so you have to use it-- before using the iterator. – Joachim Pileborg Aug 22 '12 at 10:30
up vote 3 down vote accepted

stacks.end(); refers to the (nonexistent) element after the end of the vector. You can't dereference it; doing so will cause undefined behaviour, possibly a segmentation fault.

It's not quite clear what you're doing there, but if you want an iterator for the last element, then either decrement it:

vector<stack<int> >::iterator it=stacks.end();  // points past the end
--it;                                           // points to last element

or use a reverse iterator (in which case, you use ++ rather than -- to move backwards through the sequence):

vector<stack<int> >::reverse_iterator it=stacks.rbegin();

Adding an element to a vector can invalidate it, so the it->push_back(data) at the end of push() is incorrect. You could avoid using an iterator here:

void push() {
    if (stacks.empty() || stacks.back().size()==stack_size) {
        // See below for explanation of this change
        stacks.push_back(stack<int>());
    }
    stacks.back().push(data);
}

In pop(), you probably want to remove the last stack if it's empty; otherwise, you'll end up with two empty stacks at the end, and your code will erroneously try to pop from one of those. Again, doing that could cause a segmentation fault or other undefined behavoiur. You probably want something like:

void pop() {
    if (stacks.empty()) {
        cout<<"\nEmpty Stack";
        return ;
    }
    stacks.back().pop();
    if (stacks.back().empty()) {
        stacks.pop_back();
    }
}

And now we've established an invariant that the last stack is never empty, top can be a bit simpler:

int top() {
    if (stacks.empty()) {
        cout<<"\nEmpty Stack";
        return 0;
    }
    return stacks.back().top();
}

Also, you usually don't want to create objects using new, especially in a case like this where you're putting a copy of the object into the vector and then discarding the pointer, leaking the allocated memory. You can add an empty stack to the vector like this:

stacks.push_back(stack<int>());

Sometimes (but not in this case) you might want to store pointers to allocated objects in a container; in that case, either remember to delete them when they're removed from the container, or store smart pointers such as std::unique_ptr. But in this case, just store objects.

share|improve this answer

There are many problems with the code, so it is hard to say which one is the direct cause of your problem. You need the clean them up one by one and then retest. If you still have a problem, post your new code here.

Here is the list:

  1. You have a memory leak from your allocation with new. Since you have a vector of stacks, all you need to do is resize the vector and a new stack will be allocated. So

    stacks.resize(stacks.size() + 1);

    instead of

    stack<int> *sptr= new stack<int>; stacks.push_back(*sptr);

  2. vector<>.end() returns an iterator that point to an element AFTER the last one, which is why @Joachim suggested that you need to decrement the iterator before you use it.

  3. You have a logical error when you check whether to transfer storage to a new stack - after checking is the size of the last stack is the max, and creating a new one, you keep pushing on the old one.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much guys. I have realized my mistakes. The only problem was i was using .end() and not decrementing iterator. I have rectified it and its working fine now. I am just wondering about the comment of Mike why its not recommended to use iterator to push data in the element of vector. – cexplorer Aug 22 '12 at 12:30

std::stack<int> already has the functionality you show in your example, so there is no need for a std::vector< std::stack<int> >. By just pushing and popping to the std::stack<int> you avoid most of the issues your having in your code. There is no reason to limit std::stack<int> to stack_size.

Next to that, when you need the last entry in a container, use back() instead of end().

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.