Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Do the risks caused by bypassing Perl safe signals for example like shown in the second timeout example in the DBI documentation concern only the code that uses such bypassing?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code in that example works hard to localize the change to just that section of code, or any code called from it.

There is not 100% guarantee that no code will be effected outside the code that bypasses safe signals, because signals are no longer safe. In the example the call being timed out is a DBI->connect. For most DBD's this will be implemented mostly in C, unless the C code can handle being aborted and tried again you might find that some data structures internal to the DBD, or the libraries it uses, are left in a inconstant state.

The chances of the example code going wrong is probably incredibly tiny. My personal anecdote on the issues is that I had used the traditional Perl signal handling for years before safe signals were introduced and for a long time I had never had a problem. I hadn't even been very cautious about what I did in my signal handlers. Then we managed to hit a data set that actually did trigger memory corruptions in about 1 out of ever 100 runs. Just modifying the signal handlers to use better practices, similar to those in the example, eliminated our issues.

share|improve this answer
    
The question is not very good. I would like to know if a script with such a signal handling could affect for example other scripts/processes. I don't believe it but I still ask for security. –  sid_com Aug 22 '12 at 18:13

What does that even mean? By using unsafe signals, you can corrupt Perl's internals and Perl variables. It can also cause problem if a non-reentrant C library call is interrupted.

This can lead to SEGFAULTs and other problems, and those may only manifest themselves outside the block where the timeout is in effect.

share|improve this answer
    
The question is not very good. I would like to know if a script with such a signal handling could affect for example other scripts/processes. I don't believe it but I still ask for security. –  sid_com Aug 22 '12 at 18:14
1  
Not directly, no. It only changes that process's signal handling. –  ikegami Aug 22 '12 at 18:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.