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Below is the code to convert from Cartesian to Polar co-ords. The else if statement (y>0) = pi/2 else -pi/2 ... What is the relevance of these two lines? Surely you only need theta = atan(y/x) and r = sqrt(x^2 + y^2) to determine the correct theta and r? When i go into debug and put check points to see how the code is running, it appears that this part is never used also...

Can someone please shed some light on the relevance of these lines?

Thanks.

Here is the code for the application;

    void cartesianToPolar (float x, float y, double *rPtr, double *thetaPtr)
{
    //store radius in supplied address - calc for r
    *rPtr = sqrt(x * x + y * y);

    //calc theta
    float theta;
    if (x == 0.0) {
        if (y== 0.0) {
            theta = 0.0;
        } else if ( y > 0){
        theta = M_PI_2;
    } else {
        theta = -M_PI_2;
    }
    }else{
        theta = atan(y/x);
    }
        //store theta in address
        *thetaPtr = theta;
    }
int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    double pi = 3.14;
    double integerPart;
    double fractionPart;

    // Pass add of integerPart as argument
    fractionPart = modf(pi, &integerPart);
    // Find value stored in intpart
    printf("integerPart = %.0f, fractionPart = %.2f\n", integerPart, fractionPart);

    double x = 3.0;
    double y = -4.0;
    double radius;
    double angle;

    cartesianToPolar(x,y,&angle,&radius);
    printf("(%.2f, %.2f) becomes (%.2f radiants, %.2f)\n", x, y, radius, angle);

    return 0;
}
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1  
Please consider changing your tags. There is not much objective-c in it but standard c and you may want to tag it with "polar-coordinates". –  Hermann Klecker Aug 22 '12 at 10:43
    
Sorry about that, you are correct in saying its c opposed to objective-c. –  Harry Robinson Aug 22 '12 at 10:52

2 Answers 2

This test, which is called when x==0 (in this case you can't do y/x), decides whether the point is upwards or downwards (and so the angle is PI/2 or -PI/2).

Maybe you're confused by the bad indentation. It should be :

if (x == 0.0) {
    if (y == 0.0) {
        theta = 0.0;
    } else if ( y > 0){
        theta = M_PI_2;
    } else {
        theta = -M_PI_2;
    }
}
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Right, i think it was actually. So what this is actually saying is... if x==0 skip to the else if (y >0) to prevent the code spitting out a 'undefined, as anything divided by 0 tends to infinity. –  Harry Robinson Aug 22 '12 at 10:47
    
What confused me is i assumed this was taken care of in the theta ==0.0 (as this is also put in to prevent it tending to infinity) –  Harry Robinson Aug 22 '12 at 10:49
    
Yes. When x==0, you can't use the atan way but the solution is only one of three possible values (the first one, theta=0, being a little special as this is mainly a convention). –  Denys Séguret Aug 22 '12 at 10:49
    
Sorry to add a barrage of comments - i totally understand now. Need to make my code more readable in future i think. –  Harry Robinson Aug 22 '12 at 10:50
    
No worry. And always take the time to (re)indent the code before you try to interpret it, this helps avoiding many errors. –  Denys Séguret Aug 22 '12 at 10:51

If x equals 0 the statement

theta = atan(y/x);

will thow a division by zero exeption.

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