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The following simple code doesn't give the expected result with gcc 4.7.0. Is this correct or a bug?

  unsigned count_err(std::vector<unsigned> const&num, unsigned mask)
  {
    unsigned c=0;
    // enables to reuse the lambda later (not in this simple example)
    auto f = [&] (unsigned i) { if(i&mask) ++c; };
#pragma omp parallel for reduction(+:c)
    for(unsigned i=0; i<num.size(); ++i)
      f(num[i]);
    return c;
  }

this returns zero: the reduction of c from the lambda function is not done. Btw, I expected the result to be that returned by the serial function

  unsigned count_ser(std::vector<unsigned> const&num, unsigned mask)
  {
    unsigned c=0;
    auto f = [&] (unsigned i) { if(i&mask) ++c; };
    std::for_each(num.begin(),num.end(),f);
    return c;
  }

The following implementations give the expected result (in both cases, the code definitions doing the increment of the reduction variable is moved into the parallel region)

  unsigned count_ok1(std::vector<unsigned> const&num, unsigned mask)
  {
    unsigned c=0;
    auto f = [&] (unsigned i) -> bool { return i&mask; };
#pragma omp parallel for reduction(+:c)
    for(unsigned i=0; i<num.size(); ++i)
      if(f(num[i])) ++c;
    return c;
  }

  unsigned count_ok2(std::vector<unsigned> const&num, unsigned mask)
  {
    unsigned c=0;
#pragma omp parallel reduction(+:c)
    {
      auto f = [&] (unsigned i) { if(i&mask) ++c; };
#pragma omp for
      for(unsigned i=0; i<num.size(); ++i)
        f(num[i]);
    }
    return c;
  }

Is the fact that count_err() gives a different result a compiler bug or correct?

share|improve this question
    
Don’t try to mix OpenMP with advanced constructs, it’s bound to fail: OpenMP is way too primitive for that. Its whole design of integrating with the language (but not really) is fundamentally flawed. Do a manual reduction instead. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 22 '12 at 10:51
    
@KonradRudolph, lambdas are syntactic sugar for existing more verbose C++ capabilities, thus they compile to the same code as using functors. OpenMP simply creates a thread function for the code in the #pragma section and maps the private or shared variables. It is not a big deal for the compiler to figure it out. Plus they are both implemented in the compiler. –  Lubo Antonov Aug 22 '12 at 11:16
    
@lucas1024 True, it’s not a big deal. All the more pity that it doesn’t work reliably. OpenMP even chokes on the most fundamental C++ constructs, blocks (try exiting a critical section via return, for instance). –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 22 '12 at 11:35
    
You can also define the lambda function as [&] (unsigned i, unsigned& c) { if (i&mask) ++c; }; and pass c as its second argument. Inside the parallel region it will use the local copy of c (if any) and outside the parallel region the copy in the main thread will be used. –  Hristo Iliev Aug 22 '12 at 11:37
1  
@KonradRudolph, I would say that using OpenMP outside High Performance Computing is fundamentally flawed. OpenMP was modelled after HPF and was never meant to be the Swiss army knife of multithreaded programming. As branching into or out of a parallel region is explicitly forbidden by the standard, your "try exiting a critial section via return" makes no sense. –  Hristo Iliev Aug 22 '12 at 11:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think it's not a compiler bug. Here is my explaination. I think in your first example the lambdas were holding a reference to the global c variable. The thread local copies of c were created when we entered the for-loop. So the threads were incrementing the same global variable (without any synchronization). When we exit the loop the thread-local copies of c (all equal to zero, because the lambdas don't know about them) are summed up to give you 0. The count_ok2 version works because lambdas are holding references to the local c copies.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is the correct answer. –  Hristo Iliev Aug 22 '12 at 11:29
    
@HristoIliev agree that this is explanation is most likely technically correct. But, being a bit pedantic, is it also legally correct? In other words, does the openMP standard talk about local copies in the context of reductions? If not, then there is legally only one global variable for which any openMP implementation somehow obtains a reduction, which must reduce all references to this one variable within the parallel region (though the standard may limit this). In this case, it's a compiler bug! –  Walter Aug 24 '12 at 7:44
2  
@Walter, yes, it does, otherwise I wouldn't have written that comment. More specifically §2.9.3.6 reads: "The reduction clause specifies an operator and one or more list items. For each list item, a private copy is created in each implicit task, and is initialized appropriately for the operator. After the end of the region, the original list item is updated with the values of the private copies using the specified operator." It is implementation-dependent where those private copies are located, but they are definitely different from the one outside the scope of the parallel region. –  Hristo Iliev Aug 24 '12 at 8:01

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