Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Note: RaiseError is set to false.

$dbh->begin_work;
$dbh->do("..."); # sql1, ok
$dbh->do("..."); # sql2, fails (e.g. syntax error)
$dbh->do("..."); # sql3, ok
$dbh->commit;

This will result in the effects of sql1 and sql3 to be committed, which is not desirable, since in this case I want the SQL statements to succeed/fail together. Currently my workaround is this:

eval {
    local $dbh->{RaiseError} = 1;
    $dbh->begin_work;
    $dbh->do("..."); # sql1, ok
    $dbh->do("..."); # sql2, fails (e.g. syntax error)
    $dbh->do("..."); # sql3, ok
    $dbh->commit;
};
$dbh->rollback if $@; # needed, RaiseError does not automatically rollback

but I don't quite like it. Is there another easier alternative? I prefer Postgres' behavior:

$dbh->begin_work;
$dbh->do("..."); # sql1, ok
$dbh->do("..."); # sql2, fails (e.g. syntax error)
$dbh->do("..."); # sql3, ok but fail because transaction status is now aborted
$dbh->commit;    # becomes rollback
share|improve this question
    
Wow, that's kind of nasty. I've got kind of used to Pg's behaviour. Perl doesn't have exceptions, so the driver can't throw an exeption like it does in most languages. It seems you could check for an error return at each call, but you want to avoid that and have calls ignored when the tx enters an error state, right? –  Craig Ringer Aug 22 '12 at 13:14
1  
Well, Perl does have exceptions, it's called die(), which can throw objects as well as strings. By using eval + RaiseError, I don't have to check the result of every statement. But the construction is 3-4 lines long; I was looking for a shorter alternative. –  Steven Haryanto Aug 22 '12 at 13:20
    
Ah, sorry; my Perl isn't great, I'm coming to this from the Pg side. The following article suggests that the exception handling strategy is the best you'll get portably. Unless: Since RaiseError uses die(), can you re-define die() to give it acccess to $dbh and have it auto-rollback the tx and invalidate $dbh? –  Craig Ringer Aug 22 '12 at 13:25
    
I guess you could do something like that, but using RaiseError/die requires keeping the eval {} block. As you suggested in the answer section, I'm afraid a more "magical" solution necessitates writing some wrapper or new feature in DBD::SQLite. –  Steven Haryanto Aug 22 '12 at 16:08
    
Yep, I suspect it's wrapper-or-patch time unless there's some feature hidden in the DBD::SQLite sources or an underdocumented feature in SQLite's C API for the purpose. If DBD::SQLite is well written it shouldn't be too hard to add, as there should only be a few call sites for actual execution of queries that you'd need to wrap in a transaction-health test. –  Craig Ringer Aug 22 '12 at 23:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One option is to implement a wrapper around DBD::SQLite's db handle, one that keeps track of the error state and ignores commands after an error, just like Pg does. I didn't see any sign that DBD::SQLite can do that, or that SQLite supports such a mode natively, so you probably do have to implement it in a wrapper.


I initially thought that you might want ON CONFLICT ROLLBACK instead of the default ON CONFLICT ABORT, but more reading suggests it won't do the job.

You can set the conflict and error handling resolution strategy. The docs suggest that it works at the table or per statement level, but the syntax map shows that it's really column-by-column, applying to things like NOT NULL constraints.

I'm not sure ON CONFLICT ROLLBACK will leave the tx invalid, and I'm not sure it'll work for all errors either. The docs are kind of unclear. It might roll it back and go into autocommit mode for the next statement, which would be just as bad.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.