Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a very simple Scala GUI test:

import scala.swing._

object FirstSwingApp extends SimpleGUIApplication {
  def top = new MainFrame {
    contents = new GridPanel(30, 20) {
      contents ++= 1 to 600 map (_ => new Label("test"))
    }
  }
}

Every contained label is displayed exactly as big as it needs to be:

test

Now I want to replace Label with a custom type:

contents ++= 1 to 600 map (_ => new Foo)

class Foo extends Panel {
  override def minimumSize = {
    println("minimumSize")
    new java.awt.Dimension(32, 32)
  }

  override def preferredSize = {
    println("preferredSize")
    new java.awt.Dimension(32, 32)
  }

  override def maximumSize = {
    println("maximumSize")
    new java.awt.Dimension(32, 32)
  }
}

But the result is way too small:

test2

Apparently, none of the xxxSize methods gets called, because the program produces no console output. What exactly do I have to change so that each Foo is displayed with a size of 32x32 pixels?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem here is that scala.swing is just a wrapper around javax.swing. And Label, in this case, is just an instance, that is wrapped around javax.swing.JLabel.

And when the component is being passed to javax.swing system, only the component is passed, not the wrapper.

Thus, overriding methods on wrappers will do you no good.

But you can override methods on the actual component instance. For example:

import scala.swing._
import javax.swing._
import java.awt.Dimension
import javax.swing.JPanel

object Swg extends SimpleSwingApplication {
  class Foo extends Panel {
    override lazy val peer: JPanel = new JPanel with SuperMixin {
      override def getMinimumSize = new Dimension(32, 32)
      override def getPreferredSize = new Dimension(32, 32)
      override def getMaximumSize = new Dimension(32, 32)
    }
  }

  def top = new MainFrame {
    contents = new GridPanel(30, 20) {
      contents ++= List.fill(600)(new Foo)
    }
  }
}

On my machine, that gives a frame of 640 px wide and about 960 px high - which is probably what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Excellent! Very readable. Does App do Initial Threads on behalf of it's clients? –  trashgod Aug 22 '12 at 11:34
    
@trashgod - In this case, App does nothing related to Swing - it's just a runner of standard application. But scala has similar class, named SimpleSwingApplication, that does run all that code on EDT. I'll edit the answer to it. –  Rogach Aug 22 '12 at 11:40

As Rogach said, the problem is you don't change the underlying peer. Another possibility to do that is the following:

class Foo extends Panel {
   preferredSize = new Dimension(32, 32)
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.