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I'm struggling to solve this problem in R. I have data like this:

item   id
1      500
2      500
2      600
2      700
3      500
3      600

data.frame(item = c(1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3),
           id = c(500, 500, 600, 700, 500, 600))

And I want to count the number of times a pair of items is linked to the same id. So I want this output:

item1    item2    count
    1        2        1
    2        3        2
    1        3        2

I've tried approaching this with commands like:

x_agg = aggregate(x, by=list(x$id), c)

and then

x_agg_id = lapply(x_agg$item, unique)

thinking that I could then count the occurrence of each item. But the by function seems to create an object of lists, which I don't know how to manipulate. I am hoping there is a simpler way....

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
# your data
df<-read.table(text="item   id
1      500
2      500
2      600
2      700
3      500
3      600",header=TRUE)


library(tnet)
item_item<-projecting_tm(df, method="sum")
names(item_item)<-c("item1","item2","count")

item_item

  #item1 item2 count
#1     1     2     1
#2     1     3     1
#3     2     1     1
#4     2     3     2
#5     3     1     1
#6     3     2     2

EDIT

how many ids and items do you have? you could always rename things. e.g.

numberitems<-length(unique(df$id))+9000
items<-data.frame(item=unique(df$item),newitems=c(9000:(numberitems-1)))
numberids<-length(unique(df$id))+1000
ids<-data.frame(id=unique(df$id),newids=c(1000:(numberids-1)))
newdf<-merge(df,items,by="item")
newdf<-merge(newdf,ids,by="id")
DF<-data.frame(item=newdf$newitems,id=newdf$newids)

library(tnet)
item_item<-projecting_tm(DF, method="sum")
names(item_item)<-c("item1","item2","count")

then merge back the original names afterwards....

share|improve this answer
    
this is perfect thanks! and this 'tnet' package may be very useful for other stuff i will be doing! –  Harry Palmer Aug 22 '12 at 12:07
    
oh dear - problem. some of my items / ids have very big values (10 or 11 digits), and it seems the projecting_tm function throws an error when dealing with numbers larger than 9 digits. Is there a more general solution? Perhaps one which will allow me to use strings instead of integers? –  Harry Palmer Aug 22 '12 at 15:26
    
@HarryPalmer, do you care about the order of items? For example, is the combination of 1 and 2 for item1 and item2 the same as the combination of 2 and 1 for item1 and item2? –  Ananda Mahto Aug 22 '12 at 17:09
    
Hi mrdwab, no I don't care about the order of items. Thank you so much for your detailed responses, I'm going to try them out tomorrow and let you know how it goes! –  Harry Palmer Aug 22 '12 at 22:11

I suggest this approach because it's not clear from your example output whether the answer from @user1317221_G is exactly what you are looking for. In that example, the combination 2 3 is counted 4 times, twice for item1 = 2, item2 = 3, and twice for item1 = 3, item2 = 2.

I would try the combn function. It doesn't give you exactly the same output that you're looking for, but can probably be adapted for that purpose.

Here is an example.

  1. Write a basic function that will generate combinations of whatever we give it.

    myfun = function(x) { apply(combn(x, 2), 2, paste, sep="", collapse="") }
    
  2. split() the item column of your data by id and use lapply to generate the combinations within that id.

    temp = split(df$item, df$id)
    # Drop any list items that have only one value--combn won't work there!
    temp = temp[-(which(sapply(temp,function(x) length(x) == 1),
                        arr.ind=TRUE))]
    temp1 = lapply(temp, function(x) myfun(unique(x)))
    
  3. Use unlist and then table to tabulate the frequencies of each combination.

    table(unlist(temp1))
    # 
    # 12 13 23 
    #  1  1  2
    

You can have a data.frame if you prefer.

data.frame(table(unlist(temp)))
#   Var1 Freq
# 1   12    1
# 2   13    1
# 3   23    2

Update

As mentioned, with a little bit more elbow grease, you can use this method to match your desired output too:

myfun = function(x) { apply(combn(x, 2), 2, paste, sep="", collapse=",") }
temp = split(df$item, df$id)
temp = temp[-(which(sapply(temp,function(x) length(x) == 1),
                    arr.ind=TRUE))]
temp1 = lapply(temp, function(x) myfun(unique(x)))
temp1 = data.frame(table(unlist(temp1)))
OUT = data.frame(do.call(rbind, 
                         strsplit(as.character(temp1$Var1), ",")),
                 temp1$Freq)
names(OUT) = c("item1", "item2", "count")
OUT
#   item1 item2 count
# 1     1     2     1
# 2     1     3     1
# 3     2     3     2
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. I get this error message after > temp1 = lapply(temp, function(x) myfun(unique(x))) : Warning message: In combn(x, 2) : NAs introduced by coercion Error in apply(combn(x, 2), 2, paste, sep = "", collapse = ",") : error in evaluating the argument 'X' in selecting a method for function 'apply': Error in seq_len(x) : argument must be coercible to non-negative integer –  Harry Palmer Aug 23 '12 at 10:42
    
@HarryPalmer, can you dput a few lines of the data you are working with, preferably lines where you feel you are running into errors? –  Ananda Mahto Aug 23 '12 at 11:03
    
I get the same error running on just these 15 lines. Size of integers maybe? structure(list(id = c(909128296, 5012895441, 979322531, 1475171536, 5272803586, 5377444521, 6652900376, 497636221, 9708548701, 5695003406, 996433791, 5317141656, 7197368271, 423477811, 5953151441), isbn = c(9781405910248, 9781405910248, 9781405910248, 9781405910248, 9780141906201, 9781405910248, 9781405910248, 9780141959948, 9780141910970, 9780141904443, 9781405910248, 9781405910248, 9781405910248, 9780141967899, 9780141965635)), .Names = c("id", "isbn"), row.names = c(NA, 15L), class = "data.frame") –  Harry Palmer Aug 23 '12 at 11:37

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