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What is the correct way to make a constructor's argument accessible to different methods within a class?

For example, in the code snippet below, I want to make N accessible within a method called aMethod, without changing aMethod's existing argument signature. Is myArray.length the best alternative?

public class MyClass{

  private int[][] myArray;

  public MyClass(int N){

    if(N <= 0) 
      throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Input Error: N <= 0");  

    myArray = new int[N][N];            
  }

  public void aMethod(int i, int j){

    // N won't work here. Is myArray.length the best alternative?       
    if(i <= 1 || i > N) 
      throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Row index i out of bounds");
    if(j <= 1 || j > N) 
      throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Column index j out of bounds");            
  }
}

EDIT 1 I'm testing for inputs greater than 0 so if a user enters 0 for i or 0 for j, the input is invalid.

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1  
store it in a field? –  Vlad Aug 22 '12 at 11:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just create a field for it, like you did for the array.

 public class MyClass{

    private int[][] myArray;
    private int myArraySize;

    public MyClass(int N){

      if(N <= 0) 
        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Input Error: N <= 0");  

      myArray = new int[N][N];
      myArraySize = N;            
    }

    ...
 }

However in this case I wouldn't do that, I'd change aMethod() instead:

public void aMethod(int i, int j){

    // N won't work here. Is myArray.length the best alternative       
    if(i < 0 || i >= myArray.length ) 
      throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Index i out of bounds");
    if(j < 0 || j >= myArray[i].length) 
      throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Column index j out of bounds");            
}

(I also changed the check to allow [0..N-1] instead of [1..N], as arrays are indexed from 0.)

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+1 Thanks for your two alternatives. @Bohemian and PeterLawrey recommended using the final keyword for myArraySize –  Anthony Aug 22 '12 at 12:06

why not use length of array myArray.length ?

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+1 Yes you are right. But a little voice was telling me that myArray.length was more of a hack and I was wondering what was the best way to fix this problem. –  Anthony Aug 22 '12 at 12:10

You could store it as another field, but it is stored already.

public class MyClass{

  private final int[][] myArray;

  public MyClass(int n){
    myArray = new int[n][n]; // will throw an exception if N < 0.
  }

  public void aMethod(int i, int j){
    int n = myArray.length;

    if(i < 0 || i >= n) 
      throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Index i out of bounds");
    if(j < 0 || j >= n) 
      throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Column index j out of bounds");            
  }
}

Of course index 0 and 1 are valid for arrays. If you didn't perform these checks you would get an IndexOutOfBoundException but it would tell you what the invalid value was which might be useful.

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+1 Wow! This is elegant! –  Anthony Aug 22 '12 at 12:06
    
I am new to Java but your code snippet shows polish and experience. Thanks again. –  Anthony Aug 22 '12 at 12:15
    
@Anthony With 103k rep, you would hope so. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '12 at 12:17
    
Lol yes + 8 gold! –  Anthony Aug 22 '12 at 12:18
    
My favourite quote is Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away. -- Antoine de Saint-Exupery French writer (1900 - 1944) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '12 at 12:22

Create a field (and for heaven's sake name it using usual naming conventions):

public class MyClass{

  private int[][] myArray;
  private final int n; // it should be final, because the array has the same dimension 

  public MyClass(int n){
    this.n = n;
    // other stuff
  }

  public void aMethod(int i, int j){
    // use n here
  }
}
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+1 Thanks a lot for mentioning the final keyword –  Anthony Aug 22 '12 at 12:11

It seems 'N' should be stored in a member in your class. If you do that, then it's anyway accessible to the aMethod() method also.

In any case, you should either call that method that needs the constructor parameters, in the constructor, or store those constructor parameters in member variables and make them available to other methods.

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I think that IndexOutOfBoundsException will be thrown without your attention because java check array bounds in runtime. Are you shure that you need this additional check?

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1  
It's always nice to know which of the two indices is out of bound. –  biziclop Aug 22 '12 at 11:49

add a new field in your class as I did nSize

public class MyClass{

    private int[][] myArray;
    private int nSize;

    public MyClass(int N){

    if(N <= 0) 
      throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Input Error: N <= 0");  

    myArray = new int[N][N];
    this.nSize= N;            
 }
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