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In the below code i need to get a parse exception.but the program somehow converts it to a valid date.

But if i give dthours as "07:0567" it is giving parse error.So how to keep the exact format shown.

Can anyone tell me what to do to throw an error if the date string deviates from the given format ("HH:MM:SS") even by a single character.

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String dthours="07:4856:35563333";
    SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:MM:SS"); 
    try
    {
        Date d = df.parse(dthours);
        System.out.println("d "+d);
    }
    catch (ParseException e)
    {
        System.out.println("parseError");

    }
share|improve this question
    
You want to parse 07 hours, 4856 months and 35563333 milli seconds. (no days, minutes or seconds) Perhaps your clock is broken? Perhaps you wanted "HH:mm:ss.SSS" which would look like 07:48:35.563 –  Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '12 at 11:56
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1 Answer

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Set the df.setLenient() to false so that the SimpleDateFormat will throw parse exception in such cases.

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    String dthours = "07:4856:35563333";
    SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:MM:SS");
    df.setLenient(false);
    try
    {
        Date d = df.parse(dthours);
        System.out.println("d = " + d);
    }
    catch (ParseException e)
    {
        System.out.println("parseError");
    }
}

The above snippet would print "parseError" for that input.

share|improve this answer
    
@Vikdor -1 its a shame it produces a date which doesn't make any sense. ;) See my comment above. All this does is turn off the sanity check. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '12 at 11:57
    
@PeterLawrey, You mean to say "Thu Aug 01 16:52:43 IST 2374" when it is lenient? If so, true :) –  Vikdor Aug 22 '12 at 11:58
1  
@Keppil Thank you, I missed that point, changing to +1. I still suspect he wants "HH:mm:ss" rather than "HH:MM:SS" –  Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '12 at 12:03
1  
@Vikdor I am expecting a human to suggest it ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '12 at 12:03
1  
@ashwinsakthi As I keep saying you want "HH:mm:ss" which means 24 hours, minutes and seconds. What you have is "HH:MM:SS" which means 24 hours, months and milli-seconds. There is no month 00 so this fails. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '12 at 12:11
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