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Is there a way in groovy to do something like:

class Person{
    def name, surname
}
public void aMethod(anoherBean){
    def bean = retrieveMyBean()
    p.properties = anoherBean.properties
}

The property properties is final, is there another way to do this shortcut?

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Why do you want to do that? Is there any reason? –  maba Aug 22 '12 at 13:09
    
Because I'm too lazy to write all the set methods :P. No, seriously the object is created in another point of the application, and I want to set all the properties, also if I don't know the type of the object –  rascio Aug 22 '12 at 13:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

properties is a virtual property; you have to call the individual setters. Try this:

def values = [name: 'John', surname: 'Lennon']
for( def entry : values.entries() ) {
    p.setProperty( entry.getKey(), entry.getValue() );
}

Or, using MOP:

Object.class.putAllProperties = { values -> 
    for( def entry : values.entries() ) {
        p.setProperty( entry.getKey(), entry.getValue() );
    }
}

Person p = new Person();
p.putAllProperties [name: 'John', surname: 'Lennon']

[EDIT] To achieve what you want, you must loop over the properties. This blog post describes how to do that:

def copyProperties(def source, def target){
   target.metaClass.properties.each{
      if (source.metaClass.hasProperty(source, it.name) && it.name != 'metaClass' && it.name != 'class')
         it.setProperty(target, source.metaClass.getProperty(source, it.name))
   }
}
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the code wasn't complete, check now. Can I do what I'm trying? –  rascio Aug 22 '12 at 13:24

If you don't have any special reason then just use named parameters

def p = new Person(name: 'John', surname: 'Lennon')

After question being updated

static copyProperties(from, to) {
    from.properties.each { key, value ->
        if (to.hasProperty(key) && !(key in ['class', 'metaClass']))
            to[key] = value
    }
}
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sorry, the code wasn't so clear, I edited it. –  rascio Aug 22 '12 at 13:19

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