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Suppose I have a template function:

template<typename T>
void f(T t)
{
    ...
}

and I want to write a specialization for all primitive integer types. What is the best way to do this?

What I mean is:

template<typename I where is_integral<I>::value is true>
void f(I i)
{
    ...
}

and the compiler selects the second version for integer types, and the first version for everything else?

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Is there template specialization for functions in C++11? I think in C++03 it was overloading only. –  Alexander Chertov Aug 22 '12 at 13:02
    
I've been looking for something similar, but failed. all I could do is just define a normal template, and inside I check if the given parameter is of integral type –  Moataz Elmasry Aug 22 '12 at 13:04
3  
@AlexanderChertov there is in C++03, but it is complicated. The same applies to C++11. –  juanchopanza Aug 22 '12 at 13:04
1  
@AlexanderChertov: Yes, function templates can be specialized even in C++03, but not partial specialization. –  Ben Voigt Aug 22 '12 at 13:09
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4 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Use SFINAE

// For all types except integral types:
template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_integral<T>::value>::type f(T t)
{
    // ...
}

// For integral types only:
template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value>::type f(T t)
{
    // ...
}

Note that you will have to include the full std::enable_if return value even for the declaration.

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You have changed the return value of the function from void to something else. What if the original function returned a type? For example a class X? template<class T> X f(T t) ? How would it look then? –  Andrew Tomazos Aug 22 '12 at 13:15
    
@AndrewTomazos-Fathomling, std::ebable_if::type is void, if given only 1 template parameter; or 2nd template parameter. –  Lol4t0 Aug 22 '12 at 13:16
1  
@AndrewTomazos-Fathomling The second template argument of std::enable_if is defaulted to void. That's your return type. I left it defaulted, but you can change it to whatever return type you want. You can even have integral types return a different type than non-integral types. –  Dave Aug 22 '12 at 13:16
2  
Oh so it would be template<class T> typename enable_if<is_integral<T>::value, X>::type f(T t) –  Andrew Tomazos Aug 22 '12 at 13:18
1  
It is possible to make the use of std::enable_if a bit more aesthetically pleasing, at least in my opinion. –  Luc Danton Aug 23 '12 at 12:33
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I would use overload resolution. That spares you from having to use the gross SFINAE hack. Unfortunately there are many areas where you can't avoid it, but this fortunately isn't one of those.

template<typename T>
void f(T t)
{
  f(t, std::is_integral<T>());
}

template<typename T>
void f(T t, std::true_type)
{ 
  // ...
}

template<typename T>
void f(T t, std::false_type)
{ 
  // ...
}
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Using c++11, std::enable_if ( http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types/enable_if ) can be used to do that:

template<typename T, class = typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value>::type>
void f(T t) {...}
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Is it valid code? –  Andrey Aug 22 '12 at 13:06
1  
Almost, but he did it wrong. –  Dave Aug 22 '12 at 13:07
    
edited :) the syntax is quite complicated! –  arnoo Aug 22 '12 at 13:11
2  
This still will not work, because you will get 2 overloads for integral type and compiler will not be able to select one. –  Lol4t0 Aug 22 '12 at 13:12
3  
What I don't like about this method is that you can actually pass a type to the second template argument and mess up the SFINAE (same problem with a default second parameter to the function). Doing it via return type is fool proof. On the other hand, to the uninitiated, it's not clear what the function returns. –  Dave Aug 22 '12 at 13:24
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You can use a helper template that you can specialize like this:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename T, bool = std::is_integral<T>::value>
struct Foo {
        static void bar(const T& t) { std::cout << "generic: " << t << "\n"; }
};
template <typename T>
struct Foo<T, true> {
        static void bar(const T& t) { std::cout << "integral: " << t << "\n"; }
};

template <typename T>
static void bar(const T& t) {
        return Foo<T>::bar(t);
}

int main() {
        std::string s = "string";
        bar(s);
        int i = 42;
        bar(i);
        return 0;
}

output:

generic: string
integral: 42
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1  
+1 for the class template delegate, as this allows not only explicit but also partial specialization. This is also inline with the Sutter&Alexandrescu Coding Standards' Item 66: "don't specialize function templates." –  TemplateRex Aug 22 '12 at 13:18
    
@rhalbersma I like this answer, but I don't think your reasoning is sound. No answer here used function template specialization. It simply isn't a practical option to use function template specialization for this problem. –  Dave Aug 22 '12 at 13:51
    
The question itself asked for "specialization". –  mitchnull Aug 22 '12 at 14:27
    
@Dave Even though your answer is technically correct, SFINAE is a much over-used and potentially dangerous tool. Both function template specialization and SFINAE rely on hard- to-debug function overload resolution effects. It is often easier to use tag dispatching (e.g. for more than one alternative, and for non-template functions) or delegate to class specialization (to also have a form of partial specialization). –  TemplateRex Aug 22 '12 at 18:05
    
Yes I agree. I up voted this answer and I actually think it's superior to my own. But I have different reasoning. I like it because to the user of the function the signature looks correct (there's no crazy return type that they are unsure what the actual type is) –  Dave Aug 22 '12 at 19:19
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