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I have had this category of problems before, but never been able to solve it. The problem statement this time being : There are a given number of rectangles (different dimensions, given) , and a square area of fixed size. What is the maximum number of rectangles that can be fit into the square area while minimizing remaining space?

After a lot of research I came across the knapsack problem , but wasn't able to apply the concept to this problem. What sorts of algorithm should be used to solve such problem? ?

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Your question is not clear. "What is the maximum number of rectangles that can be fit into the square area while minimizing remaining space?" Is the primary aim to fit the maximum number of rectangles into a square, or to fit into a square to minimise the remaining space? Those two goals may not be able to be reached symultaneously. For example - if you have a 10x10 square and three rectangles of 2x2, 2x2, and 10x9 to fit in it, then you will fit the maximum number of rectangles by adding both 2x2 rectangles, but you will minimize the remaining space by fitting only the 10x9 rectangle. –  Penguino Aug 22 '12 at 21:41
    
The main aim is to minimize the remaining space. –  Kyuubi Aug 23 '12 at 19:26
    
I found link, but if the size of the container (rectangle) is fixed , how do we minimize the wastage of space ? –  Kyuubi Aug 23 '12 at 19:45
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