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Dear elders of the internet,

I am trying to process a series of dictionaries, different data sets will require different processing, and each data set will need to process Create, Update, and Delete operations. Quite simply, I'm looking for a more efficient/clever way of doing this...

- (NSDictionary*)processUpdatesForDataSet:(NSString*)dataSet ofType:(NSString*)type {


if ([dataSet isEqualToString:@"countries"]) {

    if ([type isEqualToString:@"CREATE"]) {


    } else if ([type isEqualToString:@"UPDATE"]) {


    } else if ([type isEqualToString:@"DELETE"]) {


    }

} else if ([dataSet isEqualToString:@"connections"]) {

    if ([type isEqualToString:@"CREATE"]) {


    } else if ([type isEqualToString:@"UPDATE"]) {


    } else if ([type isEqualToString:@"DELETE"]) {


    }

} else if ([dataSet isEqualToString:@"sites"]) {

    if ([type isEqualToString:@"CREATE"]) {


    } else if ([type isEqualToString:@"UPDATE"]) {


    } else if ([type isEqualToString:@"DELETE"]) {


    }

}

}
share|improve this question
    
Is the create, update, and delete code for each and every dataSet type different? If so, you may wanna look over your data model. If not, you may wanna look into common handlers for each type, rather than each dataSet. –  Kalle Aug 22 '12 at 13:19
    
This isn't actually the insertion code, this is a step before that, but yes the processes will be different for each and every dataSet type. Unfortunately the API I use to pull this data does not return it in the correct format for the data model, so I need to convert it. The data model can't be changed either :( –  Sammio2 Aug 22 '12 at 13:26
    
...if this is your goal (and your question), I have to tell you the provided if ... else statement is correct. I could make more complex dynamic solution for similar problem with NSDictionary objects and blocks but I'm not quite sure it is necessary now. –  holex Aug 22 '12 at 13:27
    
Ok thanks guys, I will do it like this for the time being then. We will be moving to a RPC based model in the future, so this code isn't long term. –  Sammio2 Aug 22 '12 at 13:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a fairly special case and I'm sure some people will think this approach is a bit deranged, but there you have it.

Two options. One is to set up blocks to deal with the data sets. The downside is you have to keep those blocks in some dictionary or similar. I'm not going to go into that method. The other method is to generate a selector based on the data set and to check for and call that method.

In the processUpdates method, you would have

NSString *dataSelString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"dataSet_%@:", dataSet];
SEL dataSel = NSStringFromSelector(dataSelString);
if ([self respondsToSelector:dataSel)] {
    [self performSelector:dataSel withObject:type];
} else {
    NSLog(@"warning: unknown dataSet: %@", dataSet);
    // deal with unknown data set, e.g. alerting user or such
}

For every data set type you would then have a method in self, e.g.

- (void)dataSet_countries:(NSString *)type
{
    // handle each type accordingly
}

You could streamline the if else into a switch case as well, if you wanted, by checking the type once in the selector-caller method (processUpdates). Example:

In the .m file around the top

typedef enum {
    DataTypeInsert  = 0,
    DataTypeUpdate  = 1,
    DataTypeDelete  = 2,
    DataTypeUnknown = NSNotFound
} DataType;
static NSArray *typeValues = nil;

// in processUpdates method
if (typeValues == nil) {
    // we set up typeValues once
    typeValues = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:@"INSERT", @"UPDATE", @"DELETE", nil];
}
// since 'unknown' is NSNotFound, this will work out fine always
NSNumber *typeVal = [NSNumber numberWithInt:[typeValues indexOfObject:type]];

You would then supply typeVal instead of type to the selectored method and the method itself would do e.g.

- (void)dataSet_countries:(NSNumber *)type
{
    DataType dataType = [type intValue];
    switch (dataType) {
    case DataTypeInsert:
        break;
    // ...
    case DataTypeUnknown:
        // alert user or such that the type was invalid
    }
}

Hope that gives you some ideas.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this, I actually implemented a method using blocks previously... But the code just seemed to grow and become pretty unreadable! I'll have a go with this method and be sure to mark it as answered when i've done! –  Sammio2 Aug 22 '12 at 13:53
    
My comment about the first idea of using a dictionary mapping strings to blocks is don't do it. Essentially, this is exactly what Objective-C's method dispatch already does, but it does it using highly optimised machine code. Your second solution would be much faster. –  JeremyP Aug 22 '12 at 15:05

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