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Consider:

struct foo
{
    void foobar(){}
};

struct bar : protected foo
{
    using foo::foobar;
};

int main()
{
    bar b;
    b.foobar(); // Fine
    &bar::foobar; // Not fine
}

I'm wondering what the rationale for letting using declarations expose the member, but not a pointer to it. In fact it would seem all using declarations that changes access level works for everything except taking the address of an exposed function.

UPDATE: An example which resembles my real use case better:

#include "boost/bind.hpp"

struct foo
{
    void foobar() {}
};

struct bar : protected foo
{
    using foo::foobar;
    bar() { boost::bind( &bar::foobar, this )(); } // Crashes VS2008, GCC 4.1.1 fails to compile as it tries to go through foo*
};

int main()
{
    bar b;
}

However, Mike Seymours' explanation is spot on and explains why GCC fails. Thanks!

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4  
Are you sure? ideone.com/HbRik –  Paul Manta Aug 22 '12 at 13:19
    
@PaulManta - Might just be VS2008 then, going to do some further investigation. –  Ylisar Aug 22 '12 at 13:28
1  
Maybe you can mention which compiler you are using in the body of the question? Besides being informative, it will allow me to remove my downvote. –  juanchopanza Aug 22 '12 at 13:35
2  
To those that are voting to close: RETHINK you might not have understood the question. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 22 '12 at 13:37
1  
Will do, I'm getting some really strange behavior across compilers, especially when I involve boost::bind, which makes the VS2008 optimizing compiler straight up crash while GCC fails to compile. I'll update in a bit with a better example. –  Ylisar Aug 22 '12 at 13:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

[I am assuming that in your program the code is: void (bar::*p)() = &bar::foobar;]

The problem is not that the using declaration does not bring the identifier into space, but the semantics of &bar::foobar. I am considering (I would have done it if I had the time) refilling a Defect Report with this. There is already one such report.

Basically the problem is that the using declaration brings the base function into scope for lookup in the derived type, and the access specifiers for the expression &bar::foobar will be checked against bar. But, the result of the expression &bar::foobar is of type void (foo::*)(), not void (bar::*)(). Now, after evaluation of &bar::foobar if you try to use that as a void (bar::*)() the compiler will try to perform the conversion of the pointer to member but will fail because foo is a protected base of bar, and in the context of main you don't have access to that relationship.

Note that I consider that to be a defect in the language for two reasons: first it breaks your code: void (bar::*p)() = &bar::foobar; surprisingly fails to compile. Secondly, it breaks access protections in other cases:

class base {
protected: void f() {}
};
struct derived : base {
   void foo( base& b ) {
       b.f();                // Error
       b.*(&derived::f)();   // OK
   }
};

This problem is actually symmetric to yours, while in yours the surprising type of the address-of-member operation inhibits your use case when it shouldn't, in this case it allows an usage that is against the intent of protected.

Related links:


After the comment on using bind, it might not be the case that you are trying to convert the pointer to member to a pointer to member of bar directly, but somewhere inside bind code will be generated to apply the pointer to member to an instance of bar, and that requires the conversion.

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NOTE: this answers the original question; David Rodriguez has answered the update.

Your code is fine. According to the language standard:

7.3.3/2 Every using-declaration is a declaration and a member-declaration

That means you are declaring foobar to be a member of bar as well as foo, and so referring to it as bar::foobar is just as legitimate as foo::foobar.

My compiler (GCC) agrees with this; if yours doesn't, then it would appear to have a bug.

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2  
I think he mistakenly removed a bit from the question. void (bar::*p)() = &bar::foobar; will not compile. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 22 '12 at 13:45
    
nitpick: a using-declaration that is a member-declaration within a class x does not declare a member of class x. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 22 '12 at 17:34

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