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I'm using opencv242 + VS2010 by a notebook.
I tried to do some simple test of the GPU block in Opencv, but it showed the GPU is 100 times slower than CPU codes. In this code, I just turn the color image to grayscale image, use the function of cvtColor

Here is my code, PART1 is CPU code(test cpu RGB2GRAY), PART2 is upload image to GPU, PART3 is GPU RGB2GRAY, PART4 is CPU RGB2GRAY again. There are 3 things makes me so wondering:

1 In my code, part1 is 0.3ms, while part4 (which is exactly same with part1) is 40ms!!!
2 The part2 which upload image to GPU is 6000ms!!!
3 Part3( GPU codes) is 11ms, it is so slow for this simple image!

Thanks so much!

    #include "StdAfx.h"
    #include <iostream>
    #include "opencv2/opencv.hpp"
    #include "opencv2/gpu/gpu.hpp"
    #include "opencv2/gpu/gpumat.hpp"
    #include "opencv2/core/core.hpp"
    #include "opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp"
    #include <cuda.h>
    #include <cuda_runtime_api.h>
    #include <ctime>
    #include <windows.h>

    using namespace std;
    using namespace cv;
    using namespace cv::gpu;

    int main()
    {
        LARGE_INTEGER freq;
        LONGLONG QPart1,QPart6;
        double dfMinus, dfFreq, dfTim;
        QueryPerformanceFrequency(&freq);
        dfFreq = (double)freq.QuadPart;

        cout<<getCudaEnabledDeviceCount()<<endl;
        Mat img_src = imread("d:\\CUDA\\train.png", 1);

        // PART1 CPU code~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        // From color image to grayscale image.
        QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        QPart1 = freq.QuadPart;
        Mat img_gray;
        cvtColor(img_src,img_gray,CV_BGR2GRAY);
        QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        QPart6 = freq.QuadPart;
        dfMinus = (double)(QPart6 - QPart1);
        dfTim = 1000 * dfMinus / dfFreq;
        printf("CPU RGB2GRAY running time is %.2f ms\n\n",dfTim);

        // PART2 GPU upload image~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        GpuMat gimg_src;
        QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        QPart1 = freq.QuadPart;
        gimg_src.upload(img_src);
        QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        QPart6 = freq.QuadPart;
        dfMinus = (double)(QPart6 - QPart1);
        dfTim = 1000 * dfMinus / dfFreq;
        printf("Read image running time is %.2f ms\n\n",dfTim);

        GpuMat dst1;
        QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        QPart1 = freq.QuadPart;

        /*dst.upload(src_host);*/
        dst1.upload(imread("d:\\CUDA\\train.png", 1));

        QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        QPart6 = freq.QuadPart;
        dfMinus = (double)(QPart6 - QPart1);
        dfTim = 1000 * dfMinus / dfFreq;
        printf("Read image running time 2 is %.2f ms\n\n",dfTim);

        // PART3~ GPU code~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        // gpuimage From color image to grayscale image.
        QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        QPart1 = freq.QuadPart;

        GpuMat gimg_gray;
        gpu::cvtColor(gimg_src,gimg_gray,CV_BGR2GRAY);

        QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        QPart6 = freq.QuadPart;
        dfMinus = (double)(QPart6 - QPart1);
        dfTim = 1000 * dfMinus / dfFreq;
        printf("GPU RGB2GRAY running time is %.2f ms\n\n",dfTim);

        // PART4~CPU code(again)~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        // gpuimage From color image to grayscale image.
        QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        QPart1 = freq.QuadPart;
        Mat img_gray2;
        cvtColor(img_src,img_gray2,CV_BGR2GRAY);
        BOOL i_test=QueryPerformanceCounter(&freq);
        printf("%d \n",i_test);
        QPart6 = freq.QuadPart;
        dfMinus = (double)(QPart6 - QPart1);
        dfTim = 1000 * dfMinus / dfFreq;
        printf("CPU RGB2GRAY running time is %.2f ms\n\n",dfTim);

        cvWaitKey();
        getchar();
        return 0;
    }
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7  
It's not that the GPU is generally "slow". However, memory transfer between host and device is extremely slow. GPU computation only makes sense if you can offload a very large, highly parallel computation to the device. –  Kerrek SB Aug 22 '12 at 13:42
    
Should also check answers.opencv.org/question/1670/… –  sammy Aug 22 '12 at 14:10
    
Then you pass not allocated GpuMat you have GPU memory allocation inside GPU-optimized functions. To avoid it you should preallocate your memory with proper size before function usage. –  cuda.geek Aug 22 '12 at 19:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

cvtColor isn't doing very much work, to make grey all you have to is average three numbers.

The cvColor code on the CPU is using SSE2 instructions to process upto 8 pixels at once and if you have TBB it's using all the cores/hyperthreads, the CPU is running at 10x the clock speed of the GPU and finally you don't have to copy data onto the GPU and back.

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Thanks for answering!! In this code, I used CPU for RGB2GRAY for twice(same code, one before GPU code, while the other is after GPU). It shows that second time is much slower than the first one. But they are same codes! Could you please give me some prompts? –  David Ding Aug 23 '12 at 6:42
1  
This may also come from the fact that creating a CUDA context takes time. I don't know how you evaluate the timing of your code. –  A2B Apr 17 '13 at 19:00

try to run more than once....

-----------excerpt from http://opencv.willowgarage.com/wiki/OpenCV%20GPU%20FAQ Perfomance

Why first function call is slow?

That is because of initialization overheads. On first GPU function call Cuda Runtime API is initialized implicitly. Also some GPU code is compiled (Just In Time compilation) for your video card on the first usage. So for performance measure, it is necessary to do dummy function call and only then perform time tests.

If it is critical for an application to run GPU code only once, it is possible to use a compilation cache which is persistent over multiple runs. Please read nvcc documentation for details (CUDA_DEVCODE_CACHE environment variable).

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What GPU do you have?

Check compute compability, maybe it's the reason.

https://developer.nvidia.com/cuda-gpus

This means that for devices with CC 1.3 and 2.0 binary images are ready to run. For all newer platforms, the PTX code for 1.3 is JIT’ed to a binary image. For devices with CC 1.1 and 1.2, the PTX for 1.1 is JIT’ed. For devices with CC 1.0, no code is available and the functions throw Exception. For platforms where JIT compilation is performed first, the run is slow.

http://docs.opencv.org/modules/gpu/doc/introduction.html

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cvtColour is a small operation, and any performance boost you get from doing it on the GPU is vastly outweighed by memory transfer times between host (CPU) and device (GPU). Minimizing the latency of this memory transfer is a primary challenge of any GPU computing.

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