Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I run (respectively):

package containers;

import java.util.*;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

    List<Integer> arLst = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    List<Integer> lnLst = new LinkedList<Integer>();

    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
        arLst.add(i);
    }

    System.out.println("Array list: "+Long.toString(System.currentTimeMillis()-start));

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
        lnLst.add(i);
    }

    System.out.println("Linked list: "+Long.toString(System.currentTimeMillis()-start));
}

I get roughly the same executing time. I know that Adding time should be faster for LinkedList. I wonder why.. (It makes sense that both for middle insertinon and last elemnt - since arrays know in O(1) where to insert, unlike LinkedList that has to go through the whole list, as I recall).

share|improve this question
1  
Both lists are arraylist and you only add to the first one. Is that your real code? Assuming this is a typo, you should read this post before drawing conclusions. –  assylias Aug 22 '12 at 13:39
4  
Why are both lists in your code ArrayList? –  Baz Aug 22 '12 at 13:39
1  
I see only to ArrayList and don't see LinkedList –  Eugen Martynov Aug 22 '12 at 13:39
    
Why do you think that adding time should be faster for LinkedList? Also, mandatory reading: stackoverflow.com/questions/504103/… –  Matt Ball Aug 22 '12 at 13:41
    
You should measure the time after the list creation. It is not relevant to measure how long time it takes to create them. –  maba Aug 22 '12 at 13:42
show 2 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code differs from your explanation. However, here is the answer to your question:

ArrayList Vs LinkedList

share|improve this answer
    
That was my point... –  user1249569 Aug 22 '12 at 15:17
add comment

Ammm.... Maybe this:

List<Integer> lnLst = new ArrayList<>();

should look like this:

List<Integer> lnLst = new LinkedList<>();

And I can not understand what are you trying to measure. I think that you want to measure add perfromance and then your code should look like this:

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        List<Integer> arLst = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        List<Integer> lnLst = new LinkedList<Integer>();

        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
            arLst.add(i);
        }

        System.out.println("Array list: "+Long.toString(System.currentTimeMillis()-start));

        start = System.currentTimeMillis();

        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
            lnLst.add(i);
        }

        System.out.println("Linked list: "+Long.toString(System.currentTimeMillis()-start));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
There we go. This is how you do it OP. –  jsn Aug 22 '12 at 13:46
1  
You have a typo yourself. Second loop is adding to arLst again. –  maba Aug 22 '12 at 13:48
1  
Not a very good benchmark - you should warm up the jvm and monitor garbage collection to avoid inconsistent numbers. –  assylias Aug 22 '12 at 13:49
    
Thanks, maba, fixed. Yep, assylias, it will be better to perform full GC before each test and JIT should be "warmed up". –  gkuzmin Aug 22 '12 at 13:52
    
Oh, wow, didn't know we are running enterprise software benchmarks here. -_- –  jsn Aug 22 '12 at 14:23
show 2 more comments

Both lists know where the end of the list is so insertion time is almost the same. I would have expected LinkedList to be slightly slower as it creates a node for every element and uses more memory.

I get

TIntArrayList - 141 ms
ArrayList<Integer> - 810 ms
LinkedList<Integer> - 5190 ms.

TIntArrayList doesn't create an object for each element using the cache more efficiently.

share|improve this answer
    
arraylist needs to be resized though... –  assylias Aug 22 '12 at 13:42
    
Wow - good intuition! –  assylias Aug 22 '12 at 13:44
    
@assylias ArrayList suffers large hits, so its worst case is not great, but on average its faster. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '12 at 13:46
    
@assylias, it has amortized O(1) add at the end, so resizing is irrelevant, plus it's rare the ArrayList grows unbound. Linked list alike structures (but not the trees) have virtually no benefits in non-concurrent setups. Use ArrayList/ArrayDeque unless you have very strong idea why you want a Linked structure. There are corner cases but they usually do not rely on java.util, yet a notable exception is LinkedHashMap (it's a linked list w/ an index) –  bestsss Aug 23 '12 at 19:37
1  
@assylias. as side note, most people fail to realize that traversing linked structure both by your own code and especially by the GC is exceptionally expensive since it virtually leads to a cache miss on each iteration... –  bestsss Aug 23 '12 at 19:39
show 1 more comment

Both your lists are ArrayLists... If you change on of them to LinkedList you won't notice a big difference either. Building an ArrayList the way you do has amortized complexity of O(1) per insertion.

share|improve this answer
    
Not mention that he doesn't even add anything to the second list, and times them both at the same time. –  jsn Aug 22 '12 at 13:42
    
Yeah, I didn't even notice that :-) –  Mathias Schwarz Aug 22 '12 at 13:43
add comment

...since arrays know in O(1) where to insert, unlike LinkedList that has to go through the whole list, as I recall).

This isn't correct. Arrays (not ArrayLists) do not have a constant insert time, Java's ArrayList technically doesn't either (The add operation runs in amortized constant time for an ArrayList).

Further, inserting an element into a linked list is O(1):

In addition to implementing the List interface, the LinkedList class provides uniformly named methods to get, remove and insert an element at the beginning and end of the list.

If you are inserting into a sorted list, the complexity becomes O(N).

share|improve this answer
    
if you insert in a SortedLinked list the complexity is also O(n) since you have to traverse the list, actually it's even worse as it's a cache miss per iteration. Array backed structures have lower memory footprint and significantly faster traverse b/c of how the hardware works - i.e. cache lines and prefetching... LinkedList is just hardware unfriendly structure. –  bestsss Aug 23 '12 at 19:49
    
@bestsss: While linked lists are not cache friendly, I don't agree that a cache miss affects BigOh time complexity. A cache miss results in a penalty: reading a block from memory (or disk, depending on what cache we are talking about) which is a constant time operation. Granted, not all constant time operations are created equal. –  Chris Dargis Aug 23 '12 at 20:22
    
Of course, big O stays the same, even O(16n) is the same as O(n). My wording is bad. It's even worse is unrelated to the Big O but to the actual performance, something like it gets even worse in practice. –  bestsss Aug 23 '12 at 21:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.