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I have some (C++) functions each containing several calls creating similar arrays of the same basic type on the heap. At various points in these functions, I may need to throw an exception. Keeping track of which arrays have been deleted is a pain, and quite error prone, so I was thinking about just adding the array pointers to a Set<ArrType*>, of which I can just delete every item when I catch an exception, like this:

try
{
   set<ArrType*> sHeap;
   ArrType* myArr = new ArrType[5];
   sHeap.Add(myArr);
   someExternalRoutine(myArr);
   ...
} 
catch(CString s)
{
   DeleteAllPointersInMyHeap(sHeap);
   throw(s);
}

It feels a bit like adding epicycles, but I can't get around the fact that any one of several external calls may throw an exception, and I need to definitely delete all the pointers allocated up to that point.

Is this just foolishness? Should I just add smaller try-catch blocks around the external calls? I'd still end up with little lists of delete A; delete B; delete D; after each one...

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1  
@ricebowl But PHP and JS do have garbage collection! –  anon Jul 30 '09 at 15:48
5  
@Phil H RAII (resource acquisition is initialisation) is not a library, it;s a techinque. If you don't understand it, you are reading the wrong C++ text books. –  anon Jul 30 '09 at 15:49
2  
@Phil H: Abandon your approach (that way lies a world of endless pain) and follow Nick Meyers' answer –  Binary Worrier Jul 30 '09 at 16:08
1  
@Phil: Instead of dynamically allocating arrays, just use std::vectors, which already include RAII. –  Brian Jul 30 '09 at 17:27
4  
And since nobody has answered your title question: Yes. –  GManNickG Jul 30 '09 at 17:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't have to rely on garbage collection.

You have std::auto_ptr that provides pointer like syntax and wraps a dynamically allocated object. When destroyed, it automatically destroys the object it points to.

You could implement something similar for arrays.

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1  
auto_ptr is no use if the pointer is inside a std container, as seems to be the case here –  anon Jul 30 '09 at 15:47
2  
@Neil, it's not clear whether the OP would need to put them in a std container if he weren't using it to track what needed to be deleted. That said, auto_ptr is much trickier to use... –  Nick Meyer Jul 30 '09 at 15:49
    
@Neil: What I was saying that something similar with auto_ptr for arrays can be used (and implemented if not available). So the container knows to transfer the ownership of the contained elements. –  Cătălin Pitiș Jul 31 '09 at 5:54

Why not use a smart pointer like boost::shared_array or use a stack-allocated std::vector? For single allocations rather than array allocations, you could use boost::shared_ptr.

These implement the RAII for you. Even if you're re-using a concept like RAII, you're still reinventing the wheel if there's already a concrete implementation out there that satisfies your requirements.

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You should use a RAII techinque. You delegate the destruction to another object you create on the stack.

Then when that object goes out of scope it'll deallocate everything, no matter when it goes out of scope, even with an exception.

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Instead of

try
{
   set<ArrType*> sHeap;
   ArrType* myArr = new ArrType[5];
   sHeap.Add(myArr);
   someExternalRoutine(myArr);
   ...
}

You just need:

{
   std::vector <ArrType> myArr(5);
   someExternalRoutine(myArr);
}

with no catch block. All allocation and deallocation (whether exceptions are thrown or not) will be handled for you - this is RAII.

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Short and to the point. +1 –  jalf Jul 30 '09 at 21:45
    
The only problem I see is in the case myArr should be taken outside that context. You need to copy the vector. –  Cătălin Pitiș Jul 31 '09 at 5:56

Looks like you are overthinking it.

Rather than useing try {} catch {} use the RAII.
There are several ways to do this looking through the comments (all seem valid).

Option 1:
If you just need a single fixed(or expanding set of ArrType).
Where the lifespan ends at the end of the function

std::vector<ArrType>

Option 2:
If you need multiple arrays of ArrType Where the lifespan ends at the end of the function

boost::ptr_vector<ArrType>

This also allows you to remove the array from the ptr_vector when the object has a longer lifespan.

Notes on try {} catch {}

  • Catch by ref
    • If you catch by a specific type you are suseptable to the slicing problem as derived types are copy constructed into the variable defined in the catch expression.
  • Prefer to catch by const ref
  • When re-throwing use throw; (without the expression)
    • This will re-throw the original exception rather than copying the new exception into the place where the exception handling mechanism hides the exception during stack unwinding.
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