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I've got a lower triangular MatrixXd and I want to copy its lower values to the upper side as it'll become a symmetric matrix. How can I do it?

So far I've done:

 MatrixXd m(n,n); 
 .....
 //do something with m
 for(j=0; j < n; j++)
       {
         for(i=0; i<j; i++)
           {
             m(i,j) = m(j,i);

           }
       }

Is there a fastest way to do it? I was thinking of some internal method that is able to "copy" the lower triangular matrix to the upper. Say I've got this matrix, we call m:

1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9

what I need to obtain in m is :

1 4 7
4 5 8
7 8 9

I also know you can get the upper or the lower part of the matrix to do something:

MatrixXd m1(n,n);
 m1 = m.triangularView<Eigen::Upper>();
cout << m1 <<endl;

1 2 3
0 5 6
0 0 9

But I can't yet get what I want...

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wht's the dimensions of your matrix? –  Heisenbug Aug 22 '12 at 13:59
    
@ Heisenbug The dimension is n (from 9000 to 32000) –  Manolete Aug 22 '12 at 14:04
    
A little off-topic: is this C? Shouldn't it be m[j][i] = m[i][j]? –  Eitan T Aug 22 '12 at 14:13
    
@ EltanT m is MatrixXd object. The way to access to its members is defined that way. m is not a normal array –  Manolete Aug 22 '12 at 14:16
    
@Manolete Okay. Anyway, you don't need to copy the diagonal, so the inner loop should run while i < j (and not i = n). Not a significant speedup I'm afraid, though. –  Eitan T Aug 22 '12 at 14:20
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume here that you are referring to working with the Eigen3 c++ library. This is not clear from your question. if not, you should consider it. In any case, within Eigen, there is no need to actually copy the triangular part, to get a selfadjoint matrix. Eigen has the concept of views, and you can use a self adjoint view in order to perform an operation like e.g.

using namespace Eigen;
MatrixXd m(m,n);
...
(generate uppper triangular entries in m)
...
VectorXd r(n), p(n);
r = m.selfadjointView<Upper>() * p;

here is a small example to illustrate using fixed size matrices:

#include <Eigen/Core>

using namespace std;
using namespace Eigen;

int main()
{
    Matrix2d m,c;
    m << 1, 2,
         0, 1;

    Vector2d x(0,2), r;

    // perform copy operation 
    c = m.selfadjointView<Upper>(); 
    cout << c << endl;

    // directly apply selfadjoint view in matrix operation
    // (no entries are copied)
    r = m.selfadjointView<Upper>() * x;
} 

the output will be [1, 2, 2, 1]. now, the result in r is the same as if you had used c * x instead. Just that there is no need for copying the values in the original matrix to make it selfadjoint.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for clarify. Yes, I meant the Eigen3 c++ library. However, I can't do what you say. First I've got class Eigen::MatrixXd' has no member named 'selfAdjointView from the compiler. On the other hand, what I need is to have the same elements on the upper and the lower side of the matrix. Therefore I need somehow to "copy" the elements from one side to the other within the same MatrixXd. –  Manolete Aug 23 '12 at 9:23
    
I didn't compile the code, and there was a typo in selfadjointView. Fixed the code and added some clarifications. –  Jakob Aug 23 '12 at 9:45
    
Good! That works. I need to have all the values in the original matrix, m following your example. So what I've done is m=m.selfadjointView<Upper>();. However, it is slower than copying it with OpenMP. So I'll rather stick on my implementation. Thanks anyway! –  Manolete Aug 23 '12 at 10:08
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In case the selfadjointView is not an option for you, the solution is to use triangularView on the destination matrix:

m.triangularView<Lower>() = m.transpose();

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I think you are doing it the right way. If you knew some details about the memory layout of data in the matrix you could use some low-level optimizations. One of the techniques is loop tiling.

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I am using OpenMP already, but I was thinking in some internal method of Eigen matrix that could speedup my code. –  Manolete Aug 22 '12 at 14:34
    
I have seen a few presentations by Intel where they say they use tiling and OpenMP at the same time. –  Alexander Chertov Aug 22 '12 at 14:36
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If speed is a big issue, I would not copy anything just decorate/wrap the matrix object with a coordinate inverting object that would flip the (x,y) to (y,x). if you make the () operator an an inline function it will not incur any significant cost when you use it.

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The simplest way I can think of is by copying the upper part of m matrix trasposed on the upper part:

    m.triangularView<Upper>() = m.transpose();

For example, the following code:

    MatrixXd m(3,3);
    m << 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9;

    m.triangularView<Upper>() = m.transpose();
    std::cout << m << std::endl;

Gives the output you asked for:

1 4 7
4 5 8
7 8 9

Regards.

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This works, you can cut something but you need at least n*m/2 (less something), so only of a 2x

edit: I see that you use this matrixd object... the syntax is different, but the algorithm is this, anyway

#include <stdio.h>


int main ( )
{
    int mat [ 4 ] [ 4 ];
    int i, j;

    mat [ 0 ] [ 0 ] = 0;
    mat [ 0 ] [ 1 ] = 1;
    mat [ 0 ] [ 2 ] = 2;
    mat [ 0 ] [ 3 ] = 3;
    mat [ 1 ] [ 0 ] = 4;
    mat [ 1 ] [ 1 ] = 5;
    mat [ 1 ] [ 2 ] = 6;
    mat [ 1 ] [ 3 ] = 7;
    mat [ 2 ] [ 0 ] = 8;
    mat [ 2 ] [ 1 ] = 9;
    mat [ 2 ] [ 2 ] = 10;
    mat [ 2 ] [ 3 ] = 11;
    mat [ 3 ] [ 0 ] = 12;
    mat [ 3 ] [ 1 ] = 13;
    mat [ 3 ] [ 2 ] = 14;
    mat [ 3 ] [ 3 ] = 15;

    for ( i = 0; i < 4; i++ )
    {
        for ( j = 0; j < 4; j++ )
            printf ( "%02d", mat [ i ] [ j ] );
        printf ( "\n" );
    }
    printf ( "\n" );

    for ( i = 1; i < 4; i++ )
    {
        for ( j = 0; j < i; j++ )
            mat [ j ] [ i ] = mat [ i ] [ j ];
    }

    for ( i = 0; i < 4; i++ )
    {
        for ( j = 0; j < 4; j++ )
            printf ( "%02d ", mat [ i ] [ j ] );
        printf ( "\n" );
    }
    printf ( "\n" );

    scanf ( "%d", &i );
}
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OP is using Eigen, not plain C. –  KennyTM Aug 22 '12 at 14:20
    
@mauropellizzer Thanks for your help, but it is not that case. As I mentioned before, this is not a simple array in C. MatrixXd is an Eigen library object. –  Manolete Aug 22 '12 at 14:21
    
Yes, but this does not change much: for(j=1; j < n; j++) { for(i=0; i<=j; i++) { m(i,j) = m(j,i); } } –  mauropellizzer Aug 22 '12 at 14:22
    
@mauropellizzer: That's exactly the OP's code, and OP wants something more efficient than this. –  KennyTM Aug 22 '12 at 18:21
    
No this not start from zero :) –  mauropellizzer Aug 24 '12 at 10:09
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