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I have a problem when trying to raise an event of an object where the type implements an interface (where the event is) form another class.

Here is my code :

The interface IBaseForm

public interface IBaseForm
{
    event EventHandler AfterValidation;
}

The Form that implement the interface IBaseForm

public partial class ContactForm : IBaseForm
{
    //Code ...

    public event EventHandler AfterValidation;
}

My controller : Here where the error occurs

Error message :

The event AfterValidation can only appear on the left hand side of += or -=(except when used from whithin the type IBaseForm)

public class MyController
{
    public IBaseForm CurrentForm { get; set; }

    protected void Validation()
    {
        //Code ....

        //Here where the error occurs
        if(CurrentForm.AfterValidation != null)
            CurrentForm.AfterValidation(this, new EventArgs());
    }
}

Thanks in advance

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You cannot raise an event from outside of the defining class.

You need to create a Raise() method on your interface:

public interface IBaseForm
{
    event EventHandler AfterValidation;

    void RaiseAfterValidation();
}

public class ContactForm : IBaseForm
{
    public event EventHandler AfterValidation;

    public void RaiseAfterValidation()
    {
        if (AfterValidation != null)
            AfterValidation(this, new EventArgs());
    }
}

And in your controller:

protected void Validation()
{
    CurrentForm.RaiseAfterValidation();
}

But it is usually a design smell if you want to trigger an event from outside the defining class... usually there should be some logic in the IBaseForm implementations which triggers the event.

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Thank you for your response, I actually use MEF in my application, and I'm trying to trigger the event (who's in the plugin) from the main application. Is there any better way to do it ? –  SidAhmed Aug 22 '12 at 15:04
    
@SidAhmed: No, you can't raise an event outside the class that contains it (and you shouldn't need to). –  Şafak Gür Aug 22 '12 at 15:12
    
@SidAhmed There is no other way to trigger an event from outside. I've just wanted to point out that maybe your design have some problems. But it's hard to tell without seeing the whole picture. In the case of a plugin system I think I can be OK for the main application to trigger events in the plugins... –  nemesv Aug 22 '12 at 15:16
    
Okay, thank you, I've implemented your solution, and it works ;-) –  SidAhmed Aug 22 '12 at 15:18
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An event is essentially a structure in .NET that identifies two methods -- an add method and a remove method; each of which accepts a delegate as a parameter.

Although events are often used with methods that combine passed-in delegates to, or remove passed-in delegates from, fields of type MulticastDelegate, that is an implementation detail. While the normal purpose of creating an event is to have other code pass in delegates that they would like to have invoked under certain circumstances, the event mechanism in .NET doesn't care what, if anything, is done with the passed in delegates.

In some cases, it may be perfectly legal and logical for the add and the remove methods associated with an event to simply discard the passed-in delegates. For example, an immutable collection type might implement IObservableCollection (so as to facilitate use with e.g. a control which is supposed to automatically update as needed to show the current collection state), but discard any delegates passed to update-notification events. If the collection is never going to be updated, it would never need to use a list of subscribers, and thus it would have no reason to keep one.

Because there is no requirement that an event must do anything with passed-in delegates, it's not possible for .NET events themselves to provide any functionality beyond exposing the add and the remove methods.

Although the descriptor for the event type in .NET includes a property which can specify a raise method in addition to add and remove, that feature is never used in practice. Preliminary designs for .NET might have intended that it be used, and removing any member of a type can cause compatibility issues in some corner cases such as deserialization, but outside of such issues the property may as well not exist.

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I'm writing something relevant to the raise method and have just read this. I've found that the raise method not seem to be useful of the designing of the framework, c# doesn't event support it at all, and EventInfo.GetRaiseMethod returns null always. –  Ken Kin Jul 16 '13 at 16:25
    
@KenKin: I'd thought that it was possible to specify a "raise" method when constructing an event in CIL. Not that there'd be any usefulness to such a thing, but I thought there was space in the record for it, and that if an assembly defined it for some reason GetRaiseMethod would report what the assembly defined. Is that not the case? –  supercat Jul 16 '13 at 16:32
    
By my understanding, not really; c# compiler doesn't generate a slot for the raise method, but VB.Net does. It's not surprisingly, since there's no such syntax which is supported by the language itself. On the other hand, a raise method can be a arbitrary method which can invoke the event handler correctly. My personal guess is that the c# team thought that the raise method should be a user-define method, and the compiler would have no idea what it is like. –  Ken Kin Jul 16 '13 at 17:16
1  
@KenKin: VB.NET has a RaiseEvent keyword, which is usable only within the object that defines the event; a "raise" method in a custom event doesn't generate add metadata for GetRaiseEvent; it simply changes what code gets invoked by the RaiseEvent keyword. BTW, I really dislike the way C# uses the same name for the delegate and the event. Invocation-style syntax with event name shouldn't be a delegate invocation; it should be interpreted as "Call the event delegate if non-null else do nothing". Such a design could have saved millions of lines of code. –  supercat Jul 16 '13 at 17:18
    
Ha, I'm not so familiar to VB.Net in fact. As we can see the difference of event raising between these languages, it's not supported by c# seems reasonable to me though. –  Ken Kin Jul 16 '13 at 17:28
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