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This question was asked before, but I'm still a bit confused on how to deal with bitfield structures when moving to a platform with the opposite endianness (big to little in this case). So if I have this:

typedef struct
{
    unsigned short a :5;
    unsigned short b :1;
    unsigned short c :5;
    unsigned short d :5;
} protocol_type;

typedef union
{
  protocol_type cmd;
  unsigned short word;
}protocol_cmd_type;

Is the correct way to deal with this, like this?

typedef struct
{
    unsigned short d :5;
    unsigned short c :5;
    unsigned short b :1;
    unsigned short a :5;
} protocol_type;

typedef union
{
  protocol_type cmd;
  unsigned short word;
}protocol_cmd_type;

Or something else?

That's what I did, but it's not giving results I was expecting. However there are other issues with this code, so I'm not sure if the above was actually wrong or not. Hoping to get insight here so I can knock this part off the list.

In fact I need to have the code work on both platforms still, so I'd be wrapping things around #defines, but I didn't want to clutter things here.

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Yes, you are right that you just reverse the order of field declarations as you have shown. –  TJD Aug 22 '12 at 14:59
2  
I don't think there's a guarantee (or perhaps not even a reason to believe) that bit ordering in bitfields follow byte ordering in memory. In other words, just because you jump from a little-endian to a big-endian machine, you can't assume that you should reverse all bit fields. In other words: bitfields are very bad for portability, and to be avoided in code that should be portable. –  unwind Aug 22 '12 at 15:01
    
As unwind mentions, bitfields are very non-portable. Compilers have a lot of freedom in how they can lay them out. I think it would be better to move the code away from bitfields altogether if you can. –  Michael Burr Aug 22 '12 at 15:04
3  
@TJD I don't think that's correct. If the data was originally written as bitfields, then the byte order doesn't matter - byte 0 bit 0 will be in the same place on either endianness. However, if they were packed into an int or short before writing out, then endianness does matter - so the bottom line is we probably need to know more. Also, endianness changes the order of bytes, not bits, so simply reversing the entire list is just flat wrong. –  twalberg Aug 22 '12 at 15:06
    
Bit fields aren't portable. Endianess, alignment, bit order and padding bits are not defined by the standard. Further, bit fields can only be of type int, I believe using any other type is undefined behavior. So... tough luck. You should have used bitwise operators if you wanted portable code. –  Lundin Aug 22 '12 at 16:28

3 Answers 3

I would keep what you had originally but reverse the byte order of word before referencing (if needed).

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1  
+1 for being straight forward, as apposed to my own solution... ;-) A typicall case to use a ntohs()/htons(), sure. –  alk Aug 22 '12 at 16:18
    
I should've mentioned ntohs() myself, nice one @alk –  SpacedMonkey Aug 22 '12 at 16:23
    
I didn't know about ntohs/ntohl/htons/htonl. That saves me from having my own functions for that. Nice! –  user1615409 Aug 22 '12 at 16:34
    
A short is most definitely 16 bits on pretty much every platform. A short would be endianess-dependent on the order of 2 bytes. A long on the other hand, would be endianess-dependent over 4 bytes. Now, what happens when you try to put a short inside a bit-field, which must be of type int? Take a guess, because it is undefined behavior. –  Lundin Aug 22 '12 at 16:40

You have more to worry about than endianess issues here. Be aware that the details of how bitfields are laid out in memory is not defined by the C standard, meaning that two compilers can generate different results, even if they are targeting platforms with the same endianess. Some may treat the first bitfield listed as the lowest-address bit, and others may treat it as the highest-address bit.

You have two options for resolving this.

The first is with a healthy dose of #ifdef:

typedef struct
{
#ifdef CPU_IS_BIG_ENDIAN
    unsigned short a :5;
    unsigned short b :1;
    unsigned short c :5;
    unsigned short d :5;
#else
    unsigned short d :5;
    unsigned short c :5;
    unsigned short b :1;
    unsigned short a :5;
#endif
} protocol_type;

This leads to a messy structure definition, but allows the rest of the code to stay clean. Since you have fields that cross the byte boundary, you'll have to essentially come up with a new structure definition (possibly by trial and error) for every target architecture/platform. If you have to support multiple compilers that order bitfields differently for the same platform, then your definition will become even more complex.

The other option is to avoid bitfields altogether and use bitmasks instead:

typedef unsigned char protocol_type[2];
#define extract_a(x) ((x[0] & 0xF8) >> 3)
#define extract_b(x) ((x[0] & 0x04) >> 2)
#define extract_c(x) (((x[0] & 0x03) << 3) | ((x[1] & 0xE0) >> 5))
#define extract_d(x) ((x[1] & 0x1F))

This requires the use of getter/setter methods, but you avoid most of the portability problems since you're explicitly specifying both the bit and byte orders for everything.

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Bitmasks / bitwise operators are 100% portable to any C compiler for any CPU, so they are indeed the best solution. Bit-fields on the other hand, is one of those royally stupid things in the C standard. –  Lundin Aug 22 '12 at 16:36

I'd say the following structure is not portable in terms of not changing the bit pattern used by the structure in memory from little to big endian or verse vica:

typedef struct
{
    unsigned short a :5;
    unsigned short b :1;
    unsigned short c :5;
    unsigned short d :5;
} protocol_type;

Proof:

Big endian memory layout:

 d4   d3   d2   d1   d0   c4   c3   c2   c1   c0   b0   a4   a3   a2   a1  a0
<-             byte 1                -> <-              byte 0              ->  
MSB                                 LSB MSB                                LSB
[              address 1              ] [               address 0            ]

Little endian memory layout:

 c1   c0   b0   a4   a3   a2   a1  a0   d4   d3   d2   d1   d0   c4   c3   c2 
<-             byte 0               -> <-              byte 1               ->  
MSB                                LSB MSB                                 LSB
[              address 1             ] [               address 0             ]

From this I see no way how to re-order a, b, c, and d to form the same bit pattern on either little and big endian machines. The reason for this is the fact that the structure's member c crosses the byte boundary.


The following structure might be made portable:

typedef struct
{
    unsigned short e :5;
    unsigned short f :3;
    unsigned short g :3;
    unsigned short h :5;
} protocol_type;

To keep the bit pattern in memory when switching endianess just mod it like so:

typedef struct
{
    unsigned short g :3;
    unsigned short h :5;
    unsigned short e :5;
    unsigned short f :3;
} protocol_type;

A possible solution to the OP's problem would be to mod the structure the following way:

typedef struct
{
#if defined(BIGENDIAN)
        unsigned short a :5;
        unsigned short b :1;
        unsigned short c0 :2;
        unsigned short c1 :3;
        unsigned short d :5;
#elif defined(LITTLEENDIAN)
        unsigned short c1 :3;
        unsigned short d :5;
        unsigned short a :5;
        unsigned short b :1;
        unsigned short c0 :2;
#else
#error "endianess not supported"
#endif
} protocol_type;


#define pt_c(pt) (pt.c0 & (pt.c1 << 2))

foo(void)
{
   protocol_type pt;

   ... /* some assignment to pt ... */
   /* to then access the original value of member c use the macro */

   unsigned short c = pt_c(pt);
share|improve this answer
    
Since neither bit order nor endianess of bitfields are defined by the standard, how did you manage to come up with this? Also, strictly speaking there may be any number of padding bits and padding bytes anywhere inside a bit field. –  Lundin Aug 22 '12 at 16:31
    
I do agree with you on the missing standards. And surely this could lead to trouble when needing to be portable to many different platforms. The solution I proposed is based on my experince on x86 (VC, gcc) and s390x (gcc) and zOS. @Lundin –  alk Aug 22 '12 at 16:55

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