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I want to echo back the data sent by Linux to Arduino which is a hex command, because I'll be needing the echoed data for PHP to read. The problem is I don't want to use a newline to print the complete the data. I want to print it when there is no more data to read by the Arduino. Here's the code:

What I'm trying to accomplish:

  1. how to spot the end of a sequence of reads if not with a \n
  2. how to print hex in your desired format.

Arduino code:

char printByte[100];
byte getByte;
int pos = 0;
void setup(){
    Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop(){
    if(Serial.available() > 0){
        getByte = Serial.read();
        printByte[pos] = getByte;
        pos++;
        printByte[pos] = '\0';

        if(getByte == '\n'){
            Serial.print(printByte);
            for(int i=0; i<=sizeof(printByte);i++){
                printByte[i]=0;
            }
            pos = 0;
        }
    }
}

Linux sample code in sending hex..

unsigned char pCom[2][7]={{0xFF,0x01,0x00,0x10,0x2F,0x2F,0x6F},
                            {0xFF,0x01,0x00,0x08,0x2F,0x2F,0x67}};

write(fd,pCom[0],8);

Also, how can I trim down in Arduino code, say the 0x so it will only ouput FF 01 10, etc.?

share|improve this question
    
There seem to be two questions here: (1) how to spot the end of a sequence of reads if not with a \n (2) how to print hex in your desired format. I suggest you split it into two separate questions. –  slim Aug 22 '12 at 15:22
    
Yes that's what I'm trying to say.. I'll go edit it.. thanks.. –  demic0de Aug 22 '12 at 15:28
    
Just to be clear - I mean edit this down into one question, and create a new page for the second question. –  slim Aug 22 '12 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

From the Arduino reference pages ( http://arduino.cc/en/Serial/Print ):

Serial.print(78, HEX) gives "4E" 

So:

Serial.print(printbyte, HEX);

Should give you the output you desire.

share|improve this answer

Your first question is how to know when to stop reading, if you don't terminate packets/commands/whatever with a '\n'.

The answer is that you have to build some way of knowing how much to read into the protocol. There's nothing inherent in serial comms that tells you when a sequence ends. It's just a stream of bytes.

  • A delimiter like \n is a common way to do it (stop if you see that you've read a delimiter)
  • Fixed-length packets (read that many bytes then stop)
  • Packets containing a "length" field (read the length field, then use that do decide how many more bytes to read)

If your protocol does none of these things, there's no way your reader can know when to stop. Oh, maybe with timeouts -- but I wouldn't recommend relying on those.

share|improve this answer

What you want to do can (almost) be accomplished by replacing

Serial.print(printByte);
for(int i=0; i<=sizeof(printByte);i++){
   printByte[i]=0;
}

with

Serial.print(printByte);

for(int i=0; i<=sizeof(printByte);i++){
   if (0 == printByte[i])
       break;
   printf("%02x", printByte[i]);
}
printf("\n"); // Newline after output

if (0 == strpos(printByte, "QUIT"))
{
    // The cycle ends.
}

for(int i=0; i<=sizeof(printByte);i++){
   printByte[i]=0;
}

UPDATE: The Serial.print() command is the one outputting 0xFF...: I had not understood that you wanted to modify the output Arduino side. That, I do not know how to implement, would require modifying the sources of the Serial package. There will be a "0x%02x" or "0x02X" in there somewhere from which the 0x has to be removed.

Regarding the end of a sequence of reads, you might output a double \n. Then, if the read byte is \n and pos is 0, this will mean that the Arduino has written an empty line and the sequence has stopped.

Or you might use almost any sequence as a terminator: in the code above I've added a check for the string "QUIT".

share|improve this answer
    
thanks gotta try that one.. –  demic0de Aug 22 '12 at 15:31
    
Hi after the replacing my code with your code I can't seem to get an ouput from my serial.. can you take a look at it if i did the right thing.. if(getByte == '\n'){ Serial.print(printByte); for(int i=0; i<=sizeof(printByte);i++){ if (0 == printByte[i]) break; printf("%02x", printByte[i]); } printf("\n"); // Newline after output for(int i=0; i<=sizeof(printByte);i++){ printByte[i]=0; } } –  demic0de Aug 22 '12 at 15:45
    
Sorry, my bad. Correcting the answer... –  lserni Aug 22 '12 at 15:46
    
Thanks for the help really appreciate it.. gonna try all the things you told me.. –  demic0de Aug 22 '12 at 15:59

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