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I asked this the other day but it was closed, probably because I have a tendency to ramble so I'll get straight to the question.

I've written programs before so I'm not looking for an introduction to programming.

I was wondering if anyone had a good site/article/book that they think would be a good introduction to designing a server application.

The server will be a linux based amazon ec2 server with apache. I would prefer to use python, I know Java as well though if you think that would be a better programming language for server technology. It will be accessed over the internet via a web browser.

Again, does anyone know of a good site/article/book that they think would be a good introduction to designing a server application?

**Edit

The end application will be for use with a web browser to access via ajax to return information from a database/maintain a database and add/delete files from the server. Right now though I'm just looking to write a simple app that will take an ajax call, do something simple with it, and return the manipulated data.

**Edit

For starters I would like to just integrate with a static HTML page that uses javascript to ajax and update the HTML. Later I'll move onto creating the pages dynamically based on database information and templates with ajax calls to have the server update a database when I get more comfortable.

**Final Edit

Ok, for all the people who voted to close this. Where in your mind is "where is a good place to start learning to write a server application" not a straightforward or vague question? Seriously it isn't vague or unanswerable. The only way it would be overly broad is if you assume that when I ask about learning how to write a server application you are assuming that I already have a working knowledge of how server applications work and just left out what should be assumed to your elite hacker mind as given. To summarize, you had to learn about server application theory somewhere. All I'm asking is where (outside of school) and how can I learn the same thing.

Outside of those guys thank you all for providing the information I was looking for. It changed my thinking about how applications run on servers and gave me some insights.

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closed as not a real question by Quentin, Kazekage Gaara, Martijn Pieters, ρяσѕρєя K, j0k Aug 23 '12 at 7:35

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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5 Answers

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I think you should clarify exactly what you want to build first. Java and Python both have their own strengths and weaknesses for development and execution - they also have a multitude of libraries and frameworks that you can use. For example, in Python you could build web applications off of Tornado, Twisted, Pyramid, Django, and countless others. Java has numerous

Apache has been on a general decline from having a place in webapp stacks. It's a great general web server, but it's totally unneeded with the technologies you're mentioning. If you're deploying Java, you can use Tomcat and Jetty. If you're deploying Python, you can use something small like nginx to proxy http to the python app or use the uwsgi protocol. Most people I know have something like nginx or varnish on port 80, and just proxy everything back to python/java/php/apache/etc.

Once you explain exactly what you want to learn how to build , you'll likely have better answsers.

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I'm just looking for a good place to get started right now so that I can understand the very basics of how a server works with web apps and build from there rather than just relying on how to guides and stack overflow to fix any problems I might have after I get the app up. Thanks for the info on Tomcat though. Do you have a Java framework you're partial to or think is promising? I've revised my original question. –  Poodimizer Aug 22 '12 at 16:31
    
Based on what you've mentioned, you could just go through one of the tutorials on DjangoProject.com ( high level, lots of magic happens behind the scenes ) or PylonsProject.org ( Pyramid is low level, not magic happens behind the scenes ). I'm not really partial to Java. If I needed to harness the benefits of Java, I'd probably opt for Scala... which is interoperable with Java but a bit better/easier for web apps. Scala has a few popular web frameworks - lift and play are two of the most popular ones, but there are many. –  Jonathan Vanasco Aug 22 '12 at 16:45
    
Thanks, you've been very helpful in letting me know what technologies are available. I've looked into Django in that past and it looks very promising (high level integration with open-source for fine tuning if the need arises). This will give me something to focus my learning on and put web development into perspective when combined with one of the courses from Academic Earth or uDacity for the general overview of how web based app development works. –  Poodimizer Aug 22 '12 at 17:36
    
I'll leave the question open until tomorrow just in case someone has another good resource for learning the basics of a web based server application. –  Poodimizer Aug 22 '12 at 17:38
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What are you looking for exactly. What will contains your server and what will the main application ? just web ? webservices ? cron ? you could look at google app engine

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It'll be an amazon server. I looked at google app engine, but its seems like some of the server behaviors are a bit wonky compared to what most companies use as a server. Also I updated the question to contain the answer to your other question. Basically Web/Webservices. –  Poodimizer Aug 22 '12 at 16:12
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These days site like Udacity Coursera etc are getting popular and are doing wonderful job. I am particularly attending a course CS253. http://www.udacity.com/view#Course/cs253/CourseRev/apr2012/Unit/20006/Nugget/51001

I think thats the best resource.

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Nice, I also heard about another site academic earth so I'll check out both of those and find one that suits how noob I am at server applications. Thanks –  Poodimizer Aug 22 '12 at 16:40
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If you already know Java, look toward a Servlet application. It is a rather easy way to get introduced to HTTP servers, and Tomcat does enough of the heavy lifting to allow you to focus on the actual handling of requests in a manner that isn't heavily concerned with socket handling, protocol deciphering, etc.

If the low level server details are what you are after, Java is still a good choice, just look at a client / server socket tutorial, and start adding features / code structure.

Good luck, and have fun

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in fact you wanna know how servers work. have you ever tried to google "how a server works" ? After requests and responses theory, you have to learn differents kind of server (web, ftp, smtp etc.)

Finally, python provides networks modules

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Haha, yea. That just returns info for how a web server works with a client browser. Basically how DNS servers point you to an IP Address and the server at that address processes your request and returns the desired file. It didn't go into details like where application files should go, what group/user should own them, how to ensure users can't read my program files, how to ensure communications are encrypted etc. –  Poodimizer Aug 22 '12 at 19:18
    
this will different function of servers os. You need generic leraning, you'll find it everywhere, no specific documentation sorry. –  billyJoe Aug 22 '12 at 20:11
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