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When strip_tags(str) is used the behaviour of any HTML tags in str is removed but you still see the string that was specified by str with whatever HTML tags it contained, the same happens with JSON in reverse where a string will cause an error if used by a JSON function unless some JSON encoding function is used on the HTML string. So, where is the magic actually happening? where is the rendering being done on these cute little HTML tags and JSON tags?

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Can you clarify, or supply at least an example? I cannot make out what you're asking. –  lserni Aug 22 '12 at 15:57
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closed as not a real question by amiawizard, tereško, competent_tech, Bill the Lizard Dec 31 '12 at 2:01

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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When strip_tags(str) is used the behaviour of any HTML tags in str is removed

The HTML tags themselves are removed.

a string will cause an error if used by a JSON function unless some JSON encoding function is used on the HTML string

JSON is JSON. HTML is HTML. Trying to treat HTML as JSON shouldn't be expected to work.

So, where is the magic actually happening?

There is no "magic".

strip_tags is a function that removes blocks of text that match a certain pattern from a string.

encode_json is a function that works through a data structure and expresses it in JSON (adding [ at the start of an array, commas after items in an array, etc).

You can see an implementation of a JSON serializer in JS in json2.js.

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