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I am currently learning jQuery. I know that jQuery is a custom library for JavaScript.

I am doing some learning examples in a book that is only using JavaScript, and to further my learning experience, I am trying to make use of jQuery for anything that might be more efficient.

So, I have this code:

function addLetter(foo) {
    $(foo).unbind('click');
    var tileLetter = $(foo).attr('class').split(' ');
    var letter = tileLetter[2].charAt(1);
    if (document.getElementById('currentWord').childNodes.length > 0) {
        $('#currentWord p').append(letter);
    } else {
        var p = document.createElement('p');    
        var txt = document.createTextNode(letter);
        p.appendChild(txt);
        $('#currentWord').append(p);        
    }
}

Question #1:

If I change document.getElementById('currentWord').childNodes.length to $('#currentWord').childNodes.length it doesn't work. I thought the jQuery selector was the same thing as the JS document.getElementById as that it brought me back the DOM element. If that was the case, it'd make sense to be able to use the .childNodes.length functions on it; but it doesn't work. I guess it's not the same thing?

Question #2:

The code is textbook code. I have added all the jQuery that there is in it. My jQuery knowlede is limited, is there a more efficient way to execute the function?

The function's purpose:

This function is supposed to create a p element and fill it with a Text Node if it's the first time it's run. If the p element has already been created, it simply appends characters into it.

This is a word generating game, so you click on a letter and it gets added to a 'currentWord' div. The tile's letter is embedded in the 3rd css class, hence the attr splitting.

Thanks!

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If you know the type of the childNodes, you can expand your query to include them: $('#currentWord > p').length for example will tell you how many paragraphs are direct descendants of '#currentWord' If, its children can be of any type or are of mixed types, you can use the wildcard $('#currentWord > *').length is a direct replacement for document.getElementById('currentWord').childNodes.length –  Shmiddty Aug 22 '12 at 16:07
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Question #1:

jQuery returns a jQuery object. To return it to a regular javascript object use $(object)[0] and you can then treat it as a plain javascript (or DOM) object.

Question #2:

The efficiency looks good to me. Although you might want to use spans instead of p elements.

I guess one thing you could do (even though yours looks to run very fast) is cache the dom element:

function addLetter(foo) {
 $(foo).unbind('click');
 var tileLetter = $(foo).attr('class').split(' ');
 var letter = tileLetter[2].charAt(1);
 var currentWord = document.getElementById('currentWord');
 if (currentWord.childNodes.length > 0) {
    $(currentWord).find('p').append(letter);
 } else {
    var p = document.createElement('p');    
    p.innerHTML = letter;
    currentWord.appendChild(p);        
 }
}
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How do you measure how fast a function runs? is it a chrome plugin? –  Kore Aug 22 '12 at 16:12
1  
@Kore - Nope, it is the same with all programming. Time complexity. The major thing that affects time complexity is iteration, and every time that you do a getElementById you have to go through a process of finding the right scope and then iterating to find the element with that id, Same with $("#elementId"). In that sense, if there are n elements to look for, then each call is going to take n checks hence O(n) time complexity. Caching will reduce multiple calls to do this search for n elements. –  Travis J Aug 22 '12 at 16:16
    
@Kore - To note though, O(3n) and O(n) are generally seen as equivalent time complexity and therefore there is really not much gain in efficiency with this way or the other way. That is why I said, from an efficiency standpoint, yours is probably as fast as it is going to get. –  Travis J Aug 22 '12 at 16:18
    
@Kore You can time your code (in Chrome at least) using the Developer Tools/Profile section. No plugin required. –  Lee Taylor Aug 22 '12 at 16:24
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document.getElementById('currentWord') returns a DOM object whereas $('#currentWord') returns a DOM object wrapped inside a jqeury object.

To get the plain DOM object you can do $('#currentWord').get(0) So $('#currentWord').get(0).childNodes.length should work.

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Calls to the jQuery() function ($()) return a jQuery object containing the matching elements, not the elements themselves.

Calling $('#some-id') will, then, return a jQuery object that contains the element that would be selected by doing document.getElementById('some-id'). In order to access that element directly, you can get it out of that jQuery object, using either the .get() function or an array index syntax: $('#some-id')[0] (it's 0-indexed).

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I think you can replace all of this with a call to the text function.

function addLetter(foo) {
    $(foo).unbind('click');
    var tileLetter = $(foo).attr('class').split(' ');
    var letter = tileLetter[2].charAt(1);
    var currentWordP = $('#currentWord p');
    if (currentWordP.size() > 0) {
        currentWordP.text(currentWordP.text() + letter);
    } else {
        $('#currentWord').append("<p>" + letter + "</p>");       
    }
}
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1: Use $.get(0) or $[0] to get the DOM element. e.x. $('#currentWord')[0].childNodes.length.

2: Try this:

function addLetter(foo) {
    $(foo).unbind('click');
    var tileLetter = $(foo).attr('class').split(' ');
    var letter = tileLetter[2].charAt(1);
    if ($('#currentWord p').length > 0) {
        $('#currentWord p').append(letter);
    } else {
        $('#currentWord').append(
            $('<p />', { text: letter })
        );        
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
childNodes is all nodes, children is just child elements. So the .length will be different. –  Esailija Aug 22 '12 at 16:04
    
My bad - it achieves the same thing in this instance but won't in others. –  Royce Feng Aug 22 '12 at 16:08
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Question #1:

document.getElementById returns DOM object. more

childNodes.length is property of Node object which is returned by document.getElementById.

jQuery selector returns jQuery object more. You can get DOM object from jQuery object using .get

$('#IDselector').get(0) = document.getElementById('IDselector')

Question #2:

function addLetter(foo) {
    $(foo).unbind('click');
    var tileLetter = $(foo).attr('class').split(' ');
    var letter = tileLetter[2].charAt(1);
    if ($('currentWord p').length > 0) {
        $('#currentWord p').append(letter);
    } else {
        var p = $('<p />').text(letter);
        $('#currentWord').append(p);        
    }
}
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