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I have a simple key/value list in JSON being sent back to ASP.NET via POST. Example:

{ "key1": "value1", "key2": "value2"}

I AM NOT TRYING TO DESERIALIZE INTO STRONGLY-TYPED .NET OBJECTS

I simply need a plain old Dictionary(Of String, String), or some equivalent (hash table, Dictionary(Of String, Object), old-school StringDictionary--hell, a 2-D array of strings would work for me.

I can use anything available in ASP.NET 3.5, as well as the popular Json.NET (which I'm already using for serialization to the client).

Apparently neither of these JSON libraries have this forehead-slapping obvious capability out of the box--they are totally focused on reflection-based deserialization via strong contracts.

Any ideas?

Limitations:

  1. I don't want to implement my own JSON parser
  2. Can't use ASP.NET 4.0 yet
  3. Would prefer to stay away from the older, deprecated ASP.NET class for JSON
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1  
re: limitation 3, JavaScriptSerizlizer is used in ASP.NET MVC and is no longer deprecated. –  bdukes May 20 '11 at 14:57
20  
+ like 20 for "I AM NOT TRYING TO DESERIALIZE INTO STRONGLY-TYPED .NET OBJECTS" after just trying to get a simple !@#$ing dictionary out of .net config and various JSON parsers. –  Erik Reppen Mar 20 '13 at 15:57
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13 Answers

up vote 268 down vote accepted

Json.NET does this...

string json = @"{""key1"":""value1"",""key2"":""value2""}";

Dictionary<string, string> values = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, string>>(json);

More examples: Serializing Collections with Json.NET

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3  
Does this also work when youre values are integers. Are they automatically casted to 'strings'? –  Highmastdon Jun 13 '12 at 13:56
4  
@Highmastdon No it does not. I have found the best way to deserialize into a dictionary is to use dynamic as the type for the values: JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, dynamic>>(json); –  Erik Schierboom Jun 16 '13 at 9:57
    
Tried several answers on this page with a very messy key/value pair, and JSON.NET was the only one that I tried that worked. –  bnieland Mar 26 at 14:24
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I did discover .NET has a built in way to cast the JSON string into a Dictionary<String, Object> via the System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer type in the 3.5 System.Web.Extensions assembly. Use the method DeserializeObject(String).

I stumbled upon this when doing an ajax post (via jquery) of content type 'application/json' to a static .net Page Method and saw that the method (which had a single parameter of type Object) magically received this Dictionary.

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1  
should be System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer (missing the last "r" character) ;) –  algiecas Nov 18 '11 at 13:18
2  
but the built in javascriptserializer is buggier than json.net, that solution is better. For example the javascriptseralizer will return nulls instead of blank strings, and doesn't work at all for nullable properties, and so on. –  pilavdzice Apr 23 '12 at 22:12
    
@pilavdzice Not to mention the fun you have when trying to Parse dates as it assumes MS's non-standard date format. –  Basic Jun 21 '12 at 14:21
2  
Quick code example: var jsSerializer = new System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer(); followed by Dictionary<string, object> dict = (Dictionary<string, object>)jsSerializer.DeserializeObject(jsonString); –  Nate Cook Jun 18 '13 at 20:04
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For those searching the internet and stumbling upon this post, I wrote a blog post on how to use the JavaScriptSerializer class.

Read more... http://procbits.com/2011/04/21/quick-json-serializationdeserialization-in-c/

Here is an example:

var json = "{\"id\":\"13\", \"value\": true}";
var jss = new JavaScriptSerializer();
var table = jss.Deserialize<dynamic>(json);
Console.WriteLine(table["id"]);
Console.WriteLine(table["value"]);
share|improve this answer
    
hm, I've tried your solution...I have json like this {"id":"13", "value": true} and for me only Dictionary<dynamic> solution works –  Marko May 10 '11 at 14:35
    
ok I found it where is the problem...you need to add [] after dictionary declaration in order to deserialize properly...I'm adding comment to your blog post too... cheers ;) –  Marko May 10 '11 at 14:50
    
I've updated my answer to reflect your specific dataset. It works fine with dynamic. –  JP Richardson May 11 '11 at 14:28
    
I just wrote another JSON parser that is a bit more flexible and supports Silverlight: procbits.com/2011/08/11/… –  JP Richardson Aug 11 '11 at 19:49
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Tried to not use any external JSON implementation so i deserialised like this:

string json = "{\"id\":\"13\", \"value\": true}";

var serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer(); //using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

Dictionary<string, string> values = serializer.Deserialize<Dictionary<string, string>>(json);
share|improve this answer
5  
Add reference System.Web.Extensions to use System.Web.Script –  Patrick Cullen Feb 22 '12 at 20:07
1  
I like this answer best because it is simple and uses the .NET System.Web.Script.Serialization. It just works. I was even able to use "invalid" JSON like string json = "{'id':13, 'value': true}";. –  styfle Dec 26 '12 at 23:04
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I had same problem so I wrote this my self. This solution is differentiated from other answers because it can deserialize in to multiple levels.

Just send json string in to deserializeToDictionary function it will return non strongly-typed Dictionary<string, object> object.

private Dictionary<string, object> deserializeToDictionary(string jo)
{
    var values = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, object>>(jo);
    var values2 = new Dictionary<string, object>();
    foreach (KeyValuePair<string, object> d in values)
    {
        if (d.Value.GetType().FullName.Contains("Newtonsoft.Json.Linq.JObject"))
        {
            values2.Add(d.Key, deserializeToDictionary(d.Value.ToString()));
        }
        else
        {
            values2.Add(d.Key, d.Value);
        }
    }
    return values2;
}

Ex: This will return Dictionary<string, object> object of a Facebook JSON response.

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string responsestring = "{\"id\":\"721055828\",\"name\":\"Dasun Sameera Weerasinghe\",\"first_name\":\"Dasun\",\"middle_name\":\"Sameera\",\"last_name\":\"Weerasinghe\",\"username\":\"dasun\",\"gender\":\"male\",\"locale\":\"en_US\",  hometown: {id: \"108388329191258\", name: \"Moratuwa, Sri Lanka\",}}";
    Dictionary<string, object> values = deserializeToDictionary(responsestring);
}

Note: hometown further deserilize into a Dictionary<string, object> object.

share|improve this answer
1  
Perfect - saves making objects which you only need a couple of values from –  SomaMan Sep 21 '12 at 9:21
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Edit: This works, but the accepted answer using Json.NET is much more straightforward. Leaving this one in case someone needs BCL-only code.

It’s not supported by the .NET framework out of the box. A glaring oversight – not everyone needs to deserialize into objects with named properties. So I ended up rolling my own:

<Serializable()> Public Class StringStringDictionary
    Implements ISerializable
    Public dict As System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary(Of String, String)
    Public Sub New()
        dict = New System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary(Of String, String)
    End Sub
    Protected Sub New(info As SerializationInfo, _
          context As StreamingContext)
        dict = New System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary(Of String, String)
        For Each entry As SerializationEntry In info
            dict.Add(entry.Name, DirectCast(entry.Value, String))
        Next
    End Sub
    Public Sub GetObjectData(info As SerializationInfo, context As StreamingContext) Implements ISerializable.GetObjectData
        For Each key As String in dict.Keys
            info.AddValue(key, dict.Item(key))
        Next
    End Sub
End Class

Called with:

string MyJsonString = "{ \"key1\": \"value1\", \"key2\": \"value2\"}";
System.Runtime.Serialization.Json.DataContractJsonSerializer dcjs = new
  System.Runtime.Serialization.Json.DataContractJsonSerializer(
    typeof(StringStringDictionary));
System.IO.MemoryStream ms = new
  System.IO.MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(MyJsonString));
StringStringDictionary myfields = (StringStringDictionary)dcjs.ReadObject(ms);
Response.Write("Value of key2: " + myfields.dict["key2"]);

Sorry for the mix of C# and VB.NET…

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1  
[TestMethod] public void TestSimpleObject() { const string json = @"{""Name"":""Bob"",""Age"":42}"; var dict = new JavaScriptSerializer().DeserializeObject(json) as IDictionary<string, object>; Assert.IsNotNull(dict); Assert.IsTrue(dict.ContainsKey("Name")); Assert.AreEqual("Bob", dict["Name"]); Assert.IsTrue(dict.ContainsKey("Age")); Assert.AreEqual(42, dict["Age"]); } –  Mark Rendle Sep 22 '10 at 9:28
    
This is fantastic. Helps with WCF service implementations that interface using JSON with browser-based clients. –  Anton Jan 6 '11 at 1:26
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If you're after a lightweight, no-added-references kind of approach, maybe this bit of code I just wrote will work (I can't 100% guarantee robustness though).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

public Dictionary<string, object> ParseJSON(string json)
{
    int end;
    return ParseJSON(json, 0, out end);
}
private Dictionary<string, object> ParseJSON(string json, int start, out int end)
{
    Dictionary<string, object> dict = new Dictionary<string, object>();
    bool escbegin = false;
    bool escend = false;
    bool inquotes = false;
    string key = null;
    int cend;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    Dictionary<string, object> child = null;
    List<object> arraylist = null;
    Regex regex = new Regex(@"\\u([0-9a-z]{4})", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    int autoKey = 0;
    for (int i = start; i < json.Length; i++)
    {
        char c = json[i];
        if (c == '\\') escbegin = !escbegin;
        if (!escbegin)
        {
            if (c == '"')
            {
                inquotes = !inquotes;
                if (!inquotes && arraylist != null)
                {
                    arraylist.Add(DecodeString(regex, sb.ToString()));
                    sb.Length = 0;
                }
                continue;
            }
            if (!inquotes)
            {
                switch (c)
                {
                    case '{':
                        if (i != start)
                        {
                            child = ParseJSON(json, i, out cend);
                            if (arraylist != null) arraylist.Add(child);
                            else
                            {
                                dict.Add(key, child);
                                key = null;
                            }
                            i = cend;
                        }
                        continue;
                    case '}':
                        end = i;
                        if (key != null)
                        {
                            if (arraylist != null) dict.Add(key, arraylist);
                            else dict.Add(key, DecodeString(regex, sb.ToString()));
                        }
                        return dict;
                    case '[':
                        arraylist = new List<object>();
                        continue;
                    case ']':
                        if (key == null)
                        {
                            key = "array" + autoKey.ToString();
                            autoKey++;
                        }
                        if (arraylist != null && sb.Length > 0)
                        {
                            arraylist.Add(sb.ToString());
                            sb.Length = 0;
                        }
                        dict.Add(key, arraylist);
                        arraylist = null;
                        key = null;
                        continue;
                    case ',':
                        if (arraylist == null && key != null)
                        {
                            dict.Add(key, DecodeString(regex, sb.ToString()));
                            key = null;
                            sb.Length = 0;
                        }
                        if (arraylist != null && sb.Length > 0)
                        {
                            arraylist.Add(sb.ToString());
                            sb.Length = 0;
                        }
                       continue;
                    case ':':
                        key = DecodeString(regex, sb.ToString());
                        sb.Length = 0;
                        continue;
                }
            }
        }
        sb.Append(c);
        if (escend) escbegin = false;
        if (escbegin) escend = true;
        else escend = false;
    }
    end = json.Length - 1;
    return dict; //theoretically shouldn't ever get here
}
private string DecodeString(Regex regex, string str)
{
    return Regex.Unescape(regex.Replace(str, match => char.ConvertFromUtf32(Int32.Parse(match.Groups[1].Value, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.HexNumber))));
}

[I realise that this violates the OP Limitation #1, but technically, you didn't write it, I did]

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I just implemented this in RestSharp. This post was helpful to me.

Besides the code in the link, here is my code. I now get a Dictionary of results when I do something like this:

var jsonClient = new RestClient(url.Host);
jsonClient.AddHandler("application/json", new DynamicJsonDeserializer());
var jsonRequest = new RestRequest(url.Query, Method.GET);
Dictionary<string, dynamic> response = jsonClient.Execute<JObject>(jsonRequest).Data.ToObject<Dictionary<string, dynamic>>();

Be mindful of the sort of JSON you're expecting - in my case, I was retrieving a single object with several properties. In the attached link, the author was retrieving a list.

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My approach directly deserializes to IDictionary, without JObject or ExpandObject in between. The code uses converter, which is basically copied from ExpandoObjectConverter class found in JSON.NET sourcecode, but using IDictionary instead of ExpandoObject.

Usage:

var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings()
{
    Converters = { new DictionaryConverter() },
};
var result = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<IDictionary<string, object>>(json, settings);

Code:

// based on ExpandoObjectConverter, but using arrays instead of IList, to behave similar to System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer
public class DictionaryConverter : JsonConverter
{
    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        return ReadValue(reader);
    }

    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return (objectType == typeof(IDictionary<string, object>));
    }

    public override bool CanWrite
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    private object ReadValue(JsonReader reader)
    {
        while (reader.TokenType == JsonToken.Comment)
        {
            if (!reader.Read())
                throw JsonSerializationExceptionCreate(reader, "Unexpected end when reading IDictionary<string, object>.");
        }

        switch (reader.TokenType)
        {
            case JsonToken.StartObject:
                return ReadObject(reader);
            case JsonToken.StartArray:
                return ReadList(reader);
            default:
                if (IsPrimitiveToken(reader.TokenType))
                    return reader.Value;

                throw JsonSerializationExceptionCreate(reader, string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, "Unexpected token when converting IDictionary<string, object>: {0}", reader.TokenType));
        }
    }

    private object ReadList(JsonReader reader)
    {
        List<object> list = new List<object>();

        while (reader.Read())
        {
            switch (reader.TokenType)
            {
                case JsonToken.Comment:
                    break;
                default:
                    object v = ReadValue(reader);

                    list.Add(v);
                    break;
                case JsonToken.EndArray:
                    return list;
            }
        }

        throw JsonSerializationExceptionCreate(reader, "Unexpected end when reading IDictionary<string, object>.");
    }

    private object ReadObject(JsonReader reader)
    {
        IDictionary<string, object> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, object>();
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            switch (reader.TokenType)
            {
                case JsonToken.PropertyName:
                    string propertyName = reader.Value.ToString();

                    if (!reader.Read())
                        throw JsonSerializationExceptionCreate(reader, "Unexpected end when reading IDictionary<string, object>.");

                    object v = ReadValue(reader);

                    dictionary[propertyName] = v;
                    break;
                case JsonToken.Comment:
                    break;
                case JsonToken.EndObject:
                    return dictionary;
            }
        }

        throw JsonSerializationExceptionCreate(reader, "Unexpected end when reading IDictionary<string, object>.");
    }

    //based on internal Newtonsoft.Json.JsonReader.IsPrimitiveToken
    internal static bool IsPrimitiveToken(JsonToken token)
    {
        switch (token)
        {
            case JsonToken.Integer:
            case JsonToken.Float:
            case JsonToken.String:
            case JsonToken.Boolean:
            case JsonToken.Undefined:
            case JsonToken.Null:
            case JsonToken.Date:
            case JsonToken.Bytes:
                return true;
            default:
                return false;
        }
    }

    // based on internal Newtonsoft.Json.JsonSerializationException.Create
    private static JsonSerializationException JsonSerializationExceptionCreate(JsonReader reader, string message, Exception ex = null)
    {
        return JsonSerializationExceptionCreate(reader as IJsonLineInfo, reader.Path, message, ex);
    }

    // based on internal Newtonsoft.Json.JsonSerializationException.Create
    private static JsonSerializationException JsonSerializationExceptionCreate(IJsonLineInfo lineInfo, string path, string message, Exception ex)
    {
        message = JsonPositionFormatMessage(lineInfo, path, message);

        return new JsonSerializationException(message, ex);
    }

    // based on internal Newtonsoft.Json.JsonPosition.FormatMessage
    internal static string JsonPositionFormatMessage(IJsonLineInfo lineInfo, string path, string message)
    {
        if (!message.EndsWith(Environment.NewLine))
        {
            message = message.Trim();

            if (!message.EndsWith(".", StringComparison.Ordinal))
                message += ".";

            message += " ";
        }

        message += string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, "Path '{0}'", path);

        if (lineInfo != null && lineInfo.HasLineInfo())
            message += string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, ", line {0}, position {1}", lineInfo.LineNumber, lineInfo.LinePosition);

        message += ".";

        return message;
    }
}
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Annoyingly enough, if you want to use the default model binders, it looks like you will have to use numerical index values like a form POST.

See the following excerpt from this article http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/hh781022.aspx:

Though it’s somewhat counterintuitive, JSON requests have the same requirements—they, too, must adhere to the form post naming syntax. Take, for example, the JSON payload for the previous UnitPrice collection. The pure JSON array syntax for this data would be represented as:

[ 
  { "Code": "USD", "Amount": 100.00 },
  { "Code": "EUR", "Amount": 73.64 }
]

However, the default value providers and model binders require the data to be represented as a JSON form post:

{
  "UnitPrice[0].Code": "USD",
  "UnitPrice[0].Amount": 100.00,

  "UnitPrice[1].Code": "EUR",
  "UnitPrice[1].Amount": 73.64
}

The complex object collection scenario is perhaps one of the most widely problematic scenarios that developers run into because the syntax isn’t necessarily evident to all developers. However, once you learn the relatively simple syntax for posting complex collections, these scenarios become much easier to deal with.

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I would suggest using System.Runtime.Serialization.Json that is part of .NET 4.5.

[DataContract]
public class Foo
{
   [DataMember(Name = "data")]
   public Dictionary<string,string> Data { get; set; }
}

Then use it like this:

        var serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(List<Foo>));
        var jsonParams = @"{""data"": [{""Key"":""foo"",""Value"":""bar""}] }";
        var stream = new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(jsonParams));

        var obj = serializer.ReadObject(stream);
        Console.WriteLine(obj);
share|improve this answer
    
Where is serializer defined? –  bnieland Mar 26 at 14:16
    
@bnieland, see updated code above. –  Dan Csharpster Mar 26 at 18:25
    
..and what is a Category3MeasureModel? No hits on Google. –  bnieland Mar 26 at 22:50
1  
That's just the model class that I'm serializing for my project. It's supposed to be that Foo class, but I recopied the whole section from production code. You should create your own, like my Foo class. I renamed it to Foo to make it simpler. It's just a class of the properties or fields that you want serialized out to json and back. –  Dan Csharpster Mar 27 at 3:11
    
Thanks for taking the time to clarify +1 –  bnieland Mar 27 at 16:24
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I added a check for null values in the JSON to the other answer

I had same problem so I wrote this my self. This solution is differentiated from other answers because it can deserialize in to multiple levels.

Just send json string in to deserializeToDictionary function it will return non strongly-typed Dictionary<string, object> object.

private Dictionary<string, object> deserializeToDictionary(string jo)
{
    var values = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, object>>(jo);
    var values2 = new Dictionary<string, object>();
    foreach (KeyValuePair<string, object> d in values)
    {
        if (d.Value != null && d.Value.GetType().FullName.Contains("Newtonsoft.Json.Linq.JObject"))
        {
            values2.Add(d.Key, deserializeToDictionary(d.Value.ToString()));
        }
        else
        {
            values2.Add(d.Key, d.Value);
        }
    }
    return values2;
}

Ex: This will return Dictionary<string, object> object of a Facebook JSON response.

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string responsestring = "{\"id\":\"721055828\",\"name\":\"Dasun Sameera

Weerasinghe\",\"first_name\":\"Dasun\",\"middle_name\":\"Sameera\",\"last_name\":\"Weerasinghe\",\"username\":\"dasun\",\"gender\":\"male\",\"locale\":\"en_US\", hometown: {id: \"108388329191258\", name: \"Moratuwa, Sri Lanka\",}}"; Dictionary values = deserializeToDictionary(responsestring); }

Note: hometown further deserilize into a Dictionary<string, object> object.

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If you don't want or can't add a large third-party library like Json.NET (for example, because you're using Unity3D), I really recommend taking a look at MiniJSON. Short and sweet code, easy to extend if there's something more you need.

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