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import csv

datafile = csv.reader(open('datafile.csv','rb'), delimiter=",", quotechar='|')
date, data1, data2, data3 = [], [], [], []

for row in datafile:
    date.append(row[0])
    data1.append(row[1])
    data2.append(row[2])
    data3.append(row[3])

Here is what I want to do. As you can see, this code takes 1 csv file and creates 4 lists from it. Now I can and will do math on those lists, like data1[4]-data2[30]

But I also have a few other files that I also want to create lists from. But I want to be able to reuse my code like my math seen above ( data1[4]-data2[30] ). So ideally everything including the arrays should be named the same for the other files.

I am super new to programming so this is proving to be a bit difficult. Obviously things will clash with everything being named the same and I don't want that. So somehow via oop I want to be able to re-use my math logic and not have to copy some massive math algorithms and renaming everything.

Obviously I don't want to just do math on these 4 arrays, save the results and change file name. Nope everything has to work at the same time inside my program.

I'm hoping I can get some tips on how to do this. I'm trying to widen my scope of knowledge about how oop works but its proving to be difficult. I'm thinking getting an explanation on how to fix my own problem would be best.

So to recap, I have 4 lists created from 1 file. I want to create 4 additional lists from a different file but have the arrays be named the same. And then I only have to create my massive math calculations once and have it work for everything. And have it work for any future new data introduced into my program.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want a data container, you get this by making a class with an appropriate constructor (init method here). Below is an example where you load data from two files.

import csv

datafile1 = csv.reader(open('datafile1.csv','rb'), delimiter=",", quotechar='|')
datafile2 = csv.reader(open('datafile2.csv','rb'), delimiter=",", quotechar='|')


class data(object):

    def __init__(self,data_file):

        self.date, self.data1, self.data2, self.data3 = [], [], [], []

        for row in data_file:
            self.date.append(row[0])
            self.data1.append(row[1])
            self.data2.append(row[2])
            self.data3.append(row[3])


data1 = data(datafile1)
data2 = data(datafile2)

If you want to apply methods (the math stuff you describe) you might want to put these methods in the class, can you give some more concrete examples of exactly what you want to do?

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I get this when trying out your code: "AttributeError: 'data' object has no attribute 'date'" But I'm sure its almost correct. Well basically what I want to do is I pick a date, search for the date and get its index in the date list. Then I have that number as the starting point. From there I calculate all kinds of stuff like the average for the last 20 days of the array, or some results from a different calculation ect. But the main point then after doing the math is being able to then go to the next day and calculate everything again. And do this for all lines of code. And results are saved. –  user1594138 Aug 22 '12 at 16:38
1  
In the line date, data1, data2, data3 = [], [], [], [] ...add self. like this... self.date, self.data1, self.data2, self.data3 = [], [], [], [] –  aneroid Aug 22 '12 at 16:39
    
Thank you aneroid that worked! –  user1594138 Aug 22 '12 at 16:41
    
@Mike Btw Mike I forgot to say thank you! So thank you and btw cool field that you are in. But to try to make more sense, basically I just pick a starting point in the lists. From there I work with only 20 list spots, doing all kinds of math. And when everything is done, I start over picking a new list index location. –  user1594138 Aug 22 '12 at 16:42
    
I think your solution is perfect. And I'll do the math in methods. I don't think I need any more help. Thanks :) –  user1594138 Aug 22 '12 at 16:52

Firstly, do you necessarily want to do OOP as opposed to procedural? You could put most of that in a function and return a tuple containing the lists (yes, that's kinda like python's way to allow you to return more than one value from a function.)

The OOP version would be like @mike-vella's answer.

Procedurally, you could write:

import csv

def get_datagroup(data):
    # data is the filename = 'datafile.csv'
    datafile = csv.reader(open(data,'rb'), delimiter=",", quotechar='|')
    date, data1, data2, data3 = [], [], [], []

    for row in datafile:
        date.append(row[0])
        data1.append(row[1])
        data2.append(row[2])
        data3.append(row[3])

    return (date, data1, data2, data3)

datagroup1 = get_datagroup('datafile1.csv')
datagroup2 = get_datagroup('datafile2.csv')

Question: do you want to append each successive file's data to that corresponding list? I would guess yes since you used append:

import csv

def get_datagroup(data, data_tuples):
    # data is the filename = 'datafile.csv'
    # data_tuples holds date, data1,2,3
    datafile = csv.reader(open(data,'rb'), delimiter=",", quotechar='|')

    # you can use: data_tuples[0], data_tuples[1], data_tuples[2], data_tuples[3]
    # instead of : date,           data1,          data2,          data3
    date, data1, data2, data3 = data_tuples

    for row in datafile:
        date.append(row[0])
        data1.append(row[1])
        data2.append(row[2])
        data3.append(row[3])

    return (date, data1, data2, data3)

#initially, data tuples are empty
datagroup1 = get_datagroup('datafile1.csv', ([], [], [], []))
#then pass each subsequent call the last call's result tuple
#so that datagroup2 will have the results of datagroup1 and the new stuff
datagroup2 = get_datagroup('datafile2.csv', datagroup1)

You could make that recursive by doing:

datagroup = ([], [], [], [])
datagroup = get_datagroup('datafile1.csv', datagroup)
datagroup = get_datagroup('datafile2.csv', datagroup)
datagroup = get_datagroup('datafile3.csv', datagroup)
share|improve this answer
    
Well before I was using absolutely no methods at all. I see now how that is not only part of OOP but I did think that at first. Your solution looks really good too! But whichever way I pick (I'm not sure yet) this sure has given me a better look on how to program with methods. So thank you! To answer your question, your guess is highly logical and I should have explained better but the answer is actually no. The other files would have different data but for the same dates, so I want to look at them alongside the other data. –  user1594138 Aug 22 '12 at 17:10
    
@aneroid I think an OOP approach is well suited to this kind of thing, if only because once his code starts to become more complex the OOP approach will make it all more intuitive. –  Mike Vella Aug 23 '12 at 1:51
    
@MikeVella Possibly but so far he's not using (and doesn't need to use) any other OOP principles - inheritance, obj methods, obj properties, etc. Using just __init__ he's got all the functionality he needs. If he adds other functions to the same class to do the comparison, analysis, etc. that he speaks of then sure OOP would have benefits here. But for this simple one, a procedural approach is better. (I'm not for or against either in general, just which one is more appropriate in this case.) –  aneroid Aug 23 '12 at 3:39
    
And ofcourse, he did ask to "change this code into OOP format" so your solution was more appropriate to his question. I was providing an alternate while still having the encapsulated/repeat-able/callable code as required. –  aneroid Aug 23 '12 at 3:43

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