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I was wondering whether finally block is really reliable to close the resource or not; such as, database connection?

According to our architect, finally block is not reliable to close the database connection especially in the web application scenario.

According to the theory, finally block must be run at the end of the logic flow no matter what is the execution status of the code. Finally block is the best practice.

I am working on web application project which is using JDK-1.4, plain SQL query and getting database connection from connection pooling. Most of the SQL statements are nested statements like, single method contains multiple Statement and ResultSet objects.

In this scenario, I am skeptical about finally block because according to the test, finally block is not releasing the resource instead the web app is acquiring more connection. At end, Tomcat 5.5 is hanged every two/three hours later.

Then, I removed the finally block and release the resource just after performing the SQL operation and in the catch block. After that, web app is releasing the resource perfectly and tomcat is not hanging anymore.

Therefore, I am really confused about the theory of finally block.

Here is the code snippet, please advise if coding technique is wrong:

        ... .. . . .. . .. . . .. .. . 
    ........ . .. . . ... . .. . .

    Connection dbCon = null;
    Statement stmt1 = null;
    ResultSet rs1 = null;

    try {
        dbCon = DB.getConnection();

        stmt1 = dbCon.createStatement();            
        rs1  = stmt1.executeQuery("sql Query as String");

        while(rs1.next()){

            String col1 = rs1.getString("DB_COL_1");
            int col2 = rs1.getInt("DB_COL_2");
            String col3 = rs1.getString("DB_COL_3");

            if(col3 != null){   

                Statement stmt2 = null;
                ResultSet rs2 = null;

                try{
                    stmt2 = dbCon.createStatement();                                                        
                    rs2 = stmt2.executeQuery("sql Query as String");

                    ------- - ----

                    while(rs2.next()){
                        String col4 = rsTierMember.getString("DB_COL_4");

                        ... . .. . . . .....                                
                        . .. . .. . . . . . ..          
                    }

                    ... . .. .. ... .

                }catch(SQLException sqlExp){

                } catch (Exception e) { 

                }finally{
                    try{
                        if(rs2!=null)
                            rs2.close();
                        if(stmt2!=null)
                            stmt2.close();
                    }catch(Exception ex){}                                                                 
                }
            }

        }

         .... . .. .

    }catch (SQLException e) {

    } catch (Exception e) {     

    }finally{
        try{            
            if(rs1!=null)
                rs1.close();
            if(stmt1!=null)
                stmt1.close();
            if(dbCon!=null) 
                dbCon.close;                
        }catch(Exception ex){

        }
    }


    ...... . . . . . ...
    ... . .. . .. . . .. .
share|improve this question
8  
Then I would suspect you're not doing something right in the finally block. Show us some code. –  adarshr Aug 22 '12 at 16:18
    
What do you mean, "really reliable"? Are you claiming your finally block isn't executing? –  Dave Newton Aug 22 '12 at 16:19
1  
Java 1.4 ... Tomcat 5.5 ... dude ... upgrade your tools! –  user1329572 Aug 22 '12 at 16:20
1  
Perhaps an exception is being thrown in the finally block before the connection closing statement has executed. –  munyengm Aug 22 '12 at 16:24
    
Put some logging in those empty catch blocks. –  martijno Aug 22 '12 at 17:12

3 Answers 3

I was wondering whether finally block is really reliable to close the resource or not; such as, database connection?

It depends on what you mean by "reliable".

  • It may not execute if the JVM is aborted hard (e.g. due to a bug in the JIT)
  • It may not execute if the JVM is in the process of terminating normally (see Harmeet's answer)
  • It won't execute it the contents of the try block hangs forever
  • It won't execute if the computer suddenly loses power

In all of these cases I'd expect the database to notice that the other end of the connection had gone away anyway.

If your architect has a specific scenario in mind where they believe the finally block won't execute, he should provide an example of that scenario, at which point you'll almost certainly be able to prove them wrong. If they refuse to give any specifics, then ignore them, and suggest to management that they should start looking for a less superstitious architect.

In this scenario, I am skeptical about finally block because according to the test, finally block is not releasing the resource instead the web app is acquiring more connection. At end, Tomcat 5.5 is hanged every two/three hours later.

Sounds like the test is probably invalid, or you're leaking connections elsewhere, or you're not closing the connection. It's easy to validate though: put logging in the finally block, to validate that the code you expect to release the resource is at least being called. If it's being called but not releasing the connection, then it's no longer an issue around finally blocks.

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4  
+1 for superstitious architect –  adarshr Aug 22 '12 at 16:23

On top of the excellent answers that have already been posted, you final block is a little wrong

  try{            
        if(rs1!=null)
            rs1.close();
        if(stmt1!=null)
            stmt1.close();
        if(dbCon!=null) 
            dbCon.close;                
    }catch(Exception ex){

    }

What happens if rs1.close throws an exception? stmt1 and dbCon are not closed.

While it's a little more bulky, it will ensure the best chances for closing your resources under "normal" conditions (not accounting for every thing mentioned in the other posts)

try {      
    rs1.close();
} catch (Exception exp) {}
try {      
    stmt1.close();
} catch (Exception exp) {}
try {      
    dbCon.close;                
}catch(Exception ex){}

Not, we don't need to check for null, as the try/catch will take care of it for use. It also means that if rs1.close fails, we don't care, we can still make a best effort to close the other resource.

It would be a good idea to at least log these exceptions, just in case

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Here is one case where finally will not execute :

public class FinallyDemo {    
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            System.exit(0);
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            System.out.println(ex);
        } finally {
            System.out.println("finally");
        }
    }
}

Note: If the JVM exits while the try or catch code is being executed, then the finally block may not execute. Likewise, if the thread executing the try or catch code is interrupted or killed, the finally block may not execute even though the application as a whole continues.(reference)

And consider Jon Skeet : as it depends upon scenario ... and also what "reliable" mean to you.

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