Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Specifically in Java, how can I determine if a double is an integer? To clarify, I want to know how I can determine that the double does not in fact contain any fractions or decimals.

I am concerned essentially with the nature of floating-point numbers. The methods I thought of (and the ones I found via Google) follow basically this format:

double d = 1.0;
if((int)d == d) {
    //do stuff
}
else {
    // ...
}

I'm certainly no expert on floating-point numbers and how they behave, but I am under the impression that because the double stores only an approximation of the number, the if() conditional will only enter some of the time (perhaps even a majority of the time). But I am looking for a method which is guaranteed to work 100% of the time, regardless of how the double value is stored in the system.

Is this possible? If so, how and why?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Р̀СТȢѸ́ФХѾЦЧШЩЪЫЬѢѤЮѦѪѨѬѠѺѮѰѲѴ, tkanzakic, flavian, Yan Sklyarenko, fglez May 14 '13 at 8:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Can you use BigDecimal instead of double? –  Disco 3 Aug 22 '12 at 16:47
3  
How about (x == Math.floor(x))? –  Mike Christensen Aug 22 '12 at 16:49
2  
perhaps if((d-(int)d)>0) ..... –  perilbrain Aug 22 '12 at 16:49
1  
"is an integer" means can be converted to an int or has a null fraction part? There's a slight difference, for example 1.0e100 has a null fraction part but cannot be converted to an int (overflow). –  aka.nice Aug 22 '12 at 16:53
2  
If it means "has a null fraction part" then (int)d==d DOES NOT work fine for all d (especially those >=2^31 or <-2^31), you should rather use Math.floor(d) == d as proposed by Eric Postpischil rather than accepted answer. –  aka.nice Aug 22 '12 at 17:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

double can store an exact representation of certain values, such as small integers and (negative or positive) powers of two.

If it does indeed store an exact integer, then ((int)d == d) works fine. And indeed, for any 32-bit integer i, (int)((double)i) == i since a double can exactly represent it.

Note that for very large numbers (greater than about 2**52 in magnitude), a double will always appear to be an integer, as it will no longer be able to store any fractional part. This has implications if you are trying to cast to a Java long, for instance.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 double which has a 53-bit mantissa can represent every 32-bit int without error. It can represent most long values, but not all. Casting to (long) may be preferable. e.g. (int) 3e9 is negative. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '12 at 16:52
    
Thanks for your answer. What happens if an integer is "too large", and what would the range for which a double is capable of storing a value exactly be? –  asteri Aug 22 '12 at 16:52
4  
@JeffGohlke: Per the Java specification, conversion to an int of a double that is too large yields the largest value of int. In this case, the test (int) d == d fails to indicate that the value of d is an integer. I suggest Math.floor(d) == d as an alternative. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 22 '12 at 17:02
1  
More precisely: If, represented in scientific base-2, the binary value is terminating and has less than 52 bits (and an exponent within -1023 to +1023), a double can store it exactly. Otherwise, the value may have to be truncated. In particular, powers of two are represented exactly, as are integers less than 2**52. However, values like 0.1 have repeating (non-terminating) representations in binary so they cannot be represented exactly. –  nneonneo Aug 22 '12 at 17:04
1  
@nneonneo: That should say “less than 54 significant bits”, not “less than 52”. The significand of a double has 53 bits (1 implicit, 52 explicit). The low end of the normal exponent range is -1022, not -1023. (Denormals extend to -1074.) The condition “the binary value is terminating” is redundant, since non-terminating numerals do not have fewer than 54 bits. Values are commonly rounded, not truncated. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 22 '12 at 17:18
if(new BigDecimal(d).scale() <= 0) {
    //do stuff
}
share|improve this answer

Your method of using if((int)d == d) should always work for any 32-bit integer. To make it work up to 64 bits, you can use if((long)d == d, which is effectively the same except that it accounts for larger magnitude numbers. If d is greater than the maximum long value (or less than the minimum), then it is guaranteed to be an exact integer. A function that tests whether d is an integer can then be constructed as follows:

boolean isInteger(double d){
    if(d > Long.MAX_VALUE || d < Long.MIN_VALUE){
        return true;
    } else if((long)d == d){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

If a floating point number is an integer, then it is an exact representation of that integer.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not precisely correct. A double can be an integer, but may be the floating-point representation of multiple integers due to truncation error; this happens with integers around 2**52 and larger. –  nneonneo Aug 22 '12 at 16:58
    
Can you elaborate? I wouldn't be surprised if I missed something, but I don't see it –  murgatroid99 Aug 22 '12 at 16:58
3  
Math.floor(d) == d performs the test entirely in floating point, avoiding the problems of conversion to integer. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 22 '12 at 17:03
    
I don't see the problem with converting to an integer –  murgatroid99 Aug 22 '12 at 17:08
1  
@murgatroid99: I think you did see the problem with converting to an integer, since you added tests to work around the problem. However, I think the Long.MAX_VALUE version was better. Although that might not have worked the way you intended (Long.MAX_VALUE was implicitly converted to double for comparison, which changed the value, which made the test false when d is 2^63. But the (long) d == d test succeeds because of the same change!), but it worked. I expect the version with 1<<52 to fail because 1 has type int, so 1<<52 uses only the low five bits of 52. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 22 '12 at 17:47

How about

 if(d % 1 == 0)

This works because all integers are 0 modulo 1.

Edit To all those who object to this on the grounds of it being slow, I profiled it, and found it to be about 3.5 times slower than casting. Unless this is in a tight loop, I'd say this is a preferable way of working it out, because it's extremely clear what you're testing, and doesn't require any though about the semantics of integer casting.

I profiled it by running time on javac of

class modulo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long successes = 0;
        for(double i = 0.0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i+= 0.125) {
            if(i % 1 == 0)
                successes++;
        }
        System.out.println(successes);
    }
}

VS

class cast {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long successes = 0;
        for(double i = 0.0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i+= 0.125) {
            if((int)i == i)
                successes++;
        }
        System.out.println(successes);
    }
}

Both printed 2147483647 at the end.
Modulo took 189.99s on my machine - Cast took 54.75s.

share|improve this answer
1  
But this ignores how doubles and floating point numbers work. Not a good suggestion. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 22 '12 at 16:48
    
I'm sorry, why is this not a good suggestion? It doesn't ignore how doubles and floats work. When I say integers, I mean the mathematical objects, not the data type. –  MrBones Aug 22 '12 at 16:50
    
It is fine with regard to floating-point correctness (up to issues with NaNs and infinities that other answers also have). I would not recommend it because division (and remainder) is slow on typical processors. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 22 '12 at 18:36

Doubles are a binary fraction with a binary exponent. You cannot be certain that an integer can be exactly represented as a double, especially not if it has been calculated from other values.

Hence the normal way to approach this is to say that it needs to be "sufficiently close" to an integer value, where sufficiently close typically mean "within X %" (where X is rather small).

I.e. if X is 1 then 1.98 and 2.02 would both be considered to be close enough to be 2. If X is 0.01 then it needs to be between 1.9998 and 2.0002 to be close enough.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.