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Can anyone explain how to read first 10 lines from the text file in LINQ.

Code using StreamReader:

using (var reader = new StreamReader(fileName))
{
    string ListLines = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        ListLines[i] = reader.ReadLine();
    }
}
return ListLines;
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Have you tried anything yet? Post it up so we can take a look and help you. –  Abe Miessler Aug 22 '12 at 16:55
4  
What have you tried? (It's very simple, but it sounds like it may well be homework, and you haven't given any indication of putting effort in. If you give more information about what you've tried, I'm sure you'll get helpful answers.) –  Jon Skeet Aug 22 '12 at 16:55
    
i tried using C# - StreamReader but I want to know whether it is possible with LINQ or not. –  Rushabh Shah Aug 22 '12 at 16:56
    
This might help; stackoverflow.com/questions/1271225/… –  Dane Balia Aug 22 '12 at 16:58
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're code is optimal to achieve the goal:

var list = new List<string>();
using (var reader = new StreamReader(fileName))
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        list.Add(reader.ReadLine());
    }
}
return list;

or

using (var reader = new StreamReader(fileName))
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        yield return reader.ReadLine();
    }
}

or

var r = File.ReadLines(fileName)
            .Take(10)   // limit to first 10
            .ToArray(); // materialize, if needed
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public static IEnumerable<string> GetLine(string fileName) { var lines = File.ReadAllLines(fileName).Take(10); return lines; } // this is function which i am trying to call but it doesn't read any line –  Rushabh Shah Aug 22 '12 at 17:09
    
@RushabhShah: Call ToArray() then –  abatishchev Aug 22 '12 at 17:12
    
Thanks it did works. –  Rushabh Shah Aug 22 '12 at 17:15
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You can use:

var lines = File.ReadLines(path).Take(10));

By using ReadLines, rather than ReadAllLines you will stream data from the file, rather than reading the entire thing into memory. If you are still on C# 3.5, not 4 (when ReadLines was added) you can use the below implementation:

public static IEnumerable<string> ReadLines(string filename)
{
    using (TextReader tr = new StreamReader(filename))
    {
        string nextLine = tr.ReadLine();

        while (nextLine != null)
        {
            yield return nextLine;
            nextLine = tr.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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Doesn't File.ReadLines() (and your manual implementation) still read every line in the file? This doesn't seem to address the performance concerns. –  itsme86 Aug 22 '12 at 17:52
    
@itsme86 No, it doesn't read every line in the file. It defers execution, and because of the Take call it will only end up reading the first 10 lines. One easy way to show this is to use my method, and add a Console.WriteLine after every read line and see how many lines end up being printed. –  Servy Aug 22 '12 at 17:54
    
Ahh, that makes sense now. +1. –  itsme86 Aug 22 '12 at 17:55
    
But is it really that clever to acquire a resource for an undefined amount of time? If the system acquires a read-lock for that file no one is able to write to that file as long as the enumerator is alive. And that's possibly a long time. Is this correct? –  Jasd Aug 22 '12 at 20:10
1  
@Jasd You can just ToArray or ToList it right away to read in all of the data. For just 10 lines, that would be desirable. Alternatively it's probable that you would put the whole thing into a foreach loop. That would mean that no more than one line needs to be in memory at the same time. If you are processing a very large amount of data, that could be a requirement. If you do that though, you are correct that the file will be locked while the processing takes place. –  Servy Aug 22 '12 at 20:14
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LINQ style:

using (var textReader = File.OpenText(fileName))
{
    return Enumerable.Range(1, 10).Select(i => textReader.ReadLine());
}
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Interesting. Clever way of preserving performance by avoiding having to read the entire file. –  itsme86 Aug 22 '12 at 17:14
    
@itsme86: Thank :) –  Cuong Le Aug 22 '12 at 17:14
    
Error-checking is important, in case the file doesn't contain 10 lines. –  Jasd Aug 22 '12 at 17:16
    
@Jasd: agree, it should be, just idea to get it by linq –  Cuong Le Aug 22 '12 at 17:17
    
@abatishchev: Nope, it is still simple and get better performance than Take(10) when having to load all lines into memory, think about of big text file –  Cuong Le Aug 22 '12 at 17:25
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May you interest this mix :)

using (var reader = new StreamReader(filename))
{
    return (from p in Enumerable.Range(0, 10) select reader.ReadLine()).ToList();
}
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