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I'm executing the following code every 5 seconds, but the content appears as a block all at once, ideally it should be writing to the DOM each time it loops? So each value in the array should have its own div?

function newfunction() {
    var obj;
    var xmlhttp;
    if (window.XMLHttpRequest)
    {
        xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    else
    {
        xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }
    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function()
    {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200)
        {
            obj = JSON.parse(xmlhttp.responseText);

            for (var i = 0, n = obj.length; i < n; i++) {
                var divTag = document.createElement("div");
                divTag.id = "div" + i;
                divTag.innerHTML = obj[i];
                divTag.className+="nodeclass";
                document.getElementById("content").appendChild(divTag);
            }
        }
    }
    xmlhttp.open("GET","verify.php",true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}
window.onload=function() {
    newfunction();
    setInterval("newfunction()",5000);
}

So on page load it gets some content, then it should be adding more every 5 secs.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
How are you running it every 5 seconds? The bug is probably in your timer (setTimeout?) code. –  John Kugelman Aug 22 '12 at 17:47
    
Are you sure you want to have each loop iteration visibly modify the DOM? Doing it in bulk is significantly less taxing on the client. If you really need it separate then you can use a timeout loop construct. –  TheZ Aug 22 '12 at 17:47
    
setInterval("newfunction()",1000); the loop is part of a function which is an Ajax call, surely that loop should be updating the DOM with each line though? –  bobster Aug 22 '12 at 17:48
1  
@bobster Can you post a small, self-contained example program that demonstrates the problem? I would like to see the rest of your code since the problem is not in this for loop. You can edit your question and put it there. –  John Kugelman Aug 22 '12 at 17:51
    
@bobster when you update the DOM via JavaScript, modern browsers generally will not show you every individual update separately. Instead, they'll repaint only when necessary, or when your code is completely finished. –  Pointy Aug 22 '12 at 17:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not seeing any setTimeout or setInterval, but I would do something like this:

function processIt(obj, i) {
    var n = obj.length;
    if (i < n) {
        var divTag = document.createElement("div");
        divTag.id = "div" + i;
        divTag.innerHTML = obj[i];
        divTag.className+="nodeclass";
        document.getElementById("content").appendChild(divTag);
        setTimeout(function () {
            processIt(obj, ++i);
        }, 1000);
    }
}

var obj = document.getElementsByTagName("div"); // Or whatever "obj" is

processIt(obj, 0);
share|improve this answer
    
the setinterval isn't in the loop, but loads the loop every 5 secs. –  bobster Aug 22 '12 at 18:00
    
"but the content appears as a block all at once" - that's because the browser does it so fast that something small like adding elements can't be distinguished in the milliseconds it takes to do so –  Ian Aug 22 '12 at 18:02
    
You can make the setTimeout interval value smaller, but this would delay the adding of each element to the page, and make it look like there is some time in between adding each. Maybe make it 500. If you used jQuery, you could have them fade in and look more dramatic. –  Ian Aug 22 '12 at 18:03
    
So in order to get them to the page seperately, I need an interval inside the loop? –  bobster Aug 22 '12 at 18:05
1  
It has nothing to do with the speed of the human eye. The browser doesn't redraw the screen until all the javascript code is run, a timeout gets around this by queuing up another action for another redraw cycle. –  TheZ Aug 22 '12 at 18:23

Updated my answer as you just updated your snippet.. What does your JSON-object from verify.php look like? Is it an object or an array or simple strings?

function retrieveContent() {
    var arrayOfElements,
        xmlhttp;

    if (window.XMLHttpRequest)
    {
        xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    else
    {
        xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function()
    {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200)
        {
            arrayOfElements = JSON.parse(xmlhttp.responseText);
            insertElements(arrayOfElements);

            setTimeout(retrieveContent, 5 * 1000);
        }
    };

    xmlhttp.open("GET","verify.php",true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}

function insertElements(arrayOfElements) {
  var divTag,
      i,
      n;

  for (i = 0, n = arrayOfElements.length; i < n; i++) {
    divTag = document.createElement("div");
    divTag.id = "div" + i;
    divTag.innerHTML = obj[i];
    divTag.className+="nodeclass";
    document.getElementById("content").appendChild(divTag);
  }
}

window.onload=retrieveContent;

jsbin snippet

share|improve this answer
    
your script is loading "foo" and "bar" at the same time. How do you load them seperately? –  bobster Aug 22 '12 at 18:01
    
my updated snippet does pretty much same as yours, with some minor refactoring.. would really help if you could supply some example data you expect from the server via verify.php –  Phillip J Aug 22 '12 at 18:22

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