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I have this code for a banner that will reveal a drop down section when hovered over:

The HTML code below:

<div id="top_wrapper" class="hori_wrapper wrapper">
    <div id="top" class="hori_banner banner"></div>
    <div id="top_reveal" class="hori_reveal reveal"></div>
</div>

And the CSS:

.wrapper {
border: dashed;
position: relative;
}

.banner {
background: blue;
position: relative;
}

.reveal {
background: red;
position: absolute;
z-index: 1;
}

.hori_wrapper {
width: 300px;
height: 50px;
clear: both;
}

.hori_banner {
width: 300px;
height: 50px;
}

.hori_reveal {
width: 300px;
height: 0px;
}

#top:hover + #top_reveal, #top_reveal:hover {
-webkit-transition: height 1s ease-in .5s;
-o-transition: height 1s ease-in .5s;
-moz-transition: height 1s ease-in .5s;
-transition: height 1s ease-in .5s;
height: 300px;
top: 50px;
}

Basically, what I'd like to know is: how does CSS determine that it should animate downwards and not some other direction?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

All that happens is that it transitions to what would happen if the property was set normally.

In other words, if the height was 300px, and the top was 50px, what would it look like?

It's nothing more complex like that, and is why for browsers that don't support transitions things still work, just with no animation.

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But for example, if it's right: 50px instead, it still renders it dropping downwards. It could render it from either side or bottom up right? I guess what I'm trying to ask is: what are the rules the browser uses to decide this? –  Alex Aug 22 '12 at 20:30
    
Well, this isn't a transition thing, this is just a CSS thing. All it does is tween from the start settings to the end, whatever that looks like. There isn't any real rules, as there is only one way to do that. If you go from right:0 to right:50px, then you just go through right:1px, right:2px etc etc till you get to 50px. –  Rich Bradshaw Aug 22 '12 at 20:43

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