Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently doing some tests with the set function in the data.table package in R and have the following code:

  dt= data.table(ans=rep(c(14,16),100))
  dt[,voy:=0.0]
  set(dt,which(dt[,ans]==14),"voy",log(dt[,ans]))
  dt

Note that I want to compute the logarithm of those cases having ans=14 using the set function, but I'm not getting the correct result. This is the result I got:

  ans      voy
  1:  14 2.639057
  2:  16 0.000000
  3:  14 2.772589
  4:  16 0.000000
  5:  14 2.639057
  ---             
  196:  16 0.000000
  197:  14 2.639057
  198:  16 0.000000
  199:  14 2.772589
  200:  16 0.000000

You may note that for some rows the value of the variable voy is the expected log(14)=2.639057 but for others cases having ans=14 it is assigned 2.772589=log(16). So, I think I'm misusing the set function. How can I solve this? I know the next code can be used to carry this out:

dt[ans==14,voy:=log(ans)]

But I want to translate this into the set function syntax.

share|improve this question
2  
Why? You demonstrate a feasible, good alternative. Why replace it with something more complicated? –  Andrie Aug 22 '12 at 19:51
    
You are right @Andrie, but I just want to make sure I understand the way the set function works. Thank you! –  Nestorghh Aug 23 '12 at 14:53
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to subset the data for the value parameter. In your case, the warning Supplied 200 items to be assigned to 100 items of column 'voy' (100 unused) could have given you an idea. You were picking one by one the first 100 values of dt$ans, which indeed are alternating 14's and 16's.

This way it works:

set(dt,which(dt[,ans]==14),"voy",log(dt[ans==14,ans]))

giving:

     ans      voy
  1:  14 2.639057
  2:  16 0.000000
  3:  14 2.639057
  4:  16 0.000000
  5:  14 2.639057
 ---             
196:  16 0.000000
197:  14 2.639057
198:  16 0.000000
199:  14 2.639057
200:  16 0.000000

But it's ugly code, as @Andrie already remarked.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.