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I'm trying to compute the abstraction of the following C code fragment, with the predicate: b: { x >= 0 }

1. if( x > 5 )
2.   x = x - 2;
3. else
4.   x = abs( x ) + 6;
5. assert( x >= 0 );

so far I abstracted:

1. if( * ) // not sure if I should put if( b ) here
2.   assume( b ); b = true;
3. else
4.   assume( true ); // ? don't know how to abstract further
5. assert( b )

Any ideas how to do this ?

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In the second code, line 2. Shouldn't there be a block around the two statements? –  Lyubomir Vasilev Aug 22 '12 at 18:59
    
@Papergay:- You forgot true. –  perilbrain Aug 22 '12 at 19:08
    
I do not think the abstraction is C code; I think it is intended to be statements in a formal logic used to reason about programs. The question is not clear. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 22 '12 at 19:11
    
@LyubomirVasilev: There should be normally, but this is abstracted code, it's not to be compiled, so I think it's irrelevant whether there are braces or not. –  Maputo Aug 22 '12 at 19:11
    
Clarification: This sort of abstraction is used by the SLAM tools. The result of the abstraction of the above C code fragment should be a boolean program, and this is in turn a C program in which all variables have boolean type. –  Maputo Aug 22 '12 at 19:30

1 Answer 1

I dont know whether I am understanding you correct or not, but for the set of input predicate {x>=0} or b (used alternatively).It should be:-

{x>=0}=unknown()   //unknown function is used to generate true or false non-deterministically

if(*)
{
 assume({x>=0});
 {x>=0}=true;
}
else
{
 assume(!{x>=0});
 {x>=0}=false;
}
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But if you compute abs(x) + 6 under the condition that x <= 5, then x >= 0, therefore shouldn't {x>=0} = true? –  Maputo Aug 22 '12 at 19:53
    
So we have to check for x>=5 as well??? like else{assume({x<=5})... –  perilbrain Aug 22 '12 at 19:58
    
No, no, the condition x<=5 comes from the x>5. If !(x>5) then it has to be x<=5, right? If we then take concrete values, say x = 3, then the else branch would trigger, and x = abs(3) + 6 would satisfy x >= 0... –  Maputo Aug 22 '12 at 20:08
    
I think it should go something like this: if( * ) { assume( b ); b = b? * : false; } else b = true; assert( b ); What do you think ? –  Maputo Aug 22 '12 at 21:22

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